Are Thy Toils and Woes Increasing?

Are thy toils and woes increasing?
Are the Foe’s attacks unceasing?
Look with Faith unclouded,
Gaze with eyes unshrouded,
On the Cross!

Dost thou fear that strictest trial?
Tremblest thou at Christ’s denial?
Never rest without it, -
Clasp thine hands about it, -
—That dear Cross.

Diabolic legions press thee?
Thoughts and works of sin distress thee?
It shall chase all terror, -
It shall right all error, -
That sweet Cross!

Draw’st thou nigh to Jordan’s river?
Should’st thou tremble? Need’st thou quiver?
No! if by it lying,—
No! if on it dying,—
On the Cross!

Say then,—’Master, while I cherish
That sweet hope, I cannot perish!
After this life’s story,
Give Thou me the glory
For the Cross!’

Words: St. Methodius I, 836; Tr. John Mason Neale, 1862.

So far, I have been unable to find the original Greek. From what I can gather, the opening words are “Εἰ καὶ τὰ παρόντα”

Posted in Ancient & Mediaeval Hymns, Greek Hymns, Hymns By The Greats, Jesus Christ Our Lord, John Mason Neale, Non-English Hymns, Saints of the Church (Canonized or Beatified), St. Methodius I, The Cross | Leave a comment

O Jesu, Lord of Light and Grace

Here is the version of this hymn as it appears in the 1867 version of Hymns Ancient and Modern:

O Jesu, Lord of Light and Grace
Thou Brightness of the Father’s Face,
Thou Fountain of eternal Light,
Whose beams disperse the shades of night.

Come, Holy Sun of Heavenly Love,
Come in Thy Radiance from above,
And to our inward hearts convey
The Holy Spirit’s cloudless ray.

So we the Father’s Help will claim,
And sing the Father’s glorious Name,
And His Almighty Grace implore
That we may stand, to fall no more.

May He our actions deign to bless,
And loose the bonds of wickedness;
From sudden falls our feet defend,
And Guide us safely to the end.

May Faith, deep rooted in the soul,
Subdue our flesh, our minds control;
May guile depart, and discord cease,
And all within be joy and peace.

O hallowed thus be every day;
Let meekness be our morning ray,
Our faith like noontide splendour glow,
Our souls the twilight never know.

*All Praise to God the Father be;
All praise, Eternal Son, to Thee;
Whom with the Spirit we adore
For ever and for evermore.

Amen.

Words: St. Ambrose of Milan, 4th Century; tr. John Chandler, 1837.
Tune:Ely” Thomas Turton, 1844.
Alternate Tune: Lauds” proper Sarum melody.
Alternate Tune:St. Bernard (Monk)” William H. Monk, 1861.

*The 1867 version of Hymns Ancient and Modern omits a verse here and substitutes this closing doxology.

Here is an alternate version of this hymn, which is somewhat different and includes the missing verse (denoted by the asterisk *), minus the doxology (courtesy of CyberHymnal). I am not sure which is the more original version:

O Jesus, Lord of heavenly grace,
Thou brightness of Thy Father’s face,
Thou fountain of eternal light,
Whose beams disperse the shades of night.

Come, holy sun of heavenly love,
Shower down Thy radiance from above,
And to our inward hearts convey
The Holy Spirit’s cloudless ray.

So we the Father’s help will claim,
And sing the Father’s glorious name,
And His almighty grace implore
That we may stand, to fall no more.

May He our actions deign to bless,
And loose the bonds of wickedness;
From sudden falls our feet defend,
And bring us to a prosperous end.

May faith, deep rooted in the soul,
Subdue our flesh, our minds control;
May guile depart, and discord cease,
And all within be joy and peace.

So let us gladly pass the day;
Our thoughts be pure as morning ray;
And faithful love our noonday light;
And hope our sunset, calm and bright.

*O Christ, with each returning morn
Thine image to our hearts is borne:
O may we ever clearly see
Our Savior and our God in Thee.

Here is the original Latin text of St. Ambrose’s hymn (with the closing doxology added in the Roman Breviary):

Splendor Paternae gloriae,
de luce lucem proferens,
lux lucis et fons luminis,
diem dies illuminans.

Verusque sol, illabere
micans nitore perpeti,
iubarque Sancti Spiritus
infunde nostris sensibus.

Votis vocemus et Patrem,
Patrem perennis gloriae,
Patrem potentis gratiae,
culpam releget lubricam.

Informet actus strenuos,
dentem retundat invidi,
casus secundet asperos,
donet gerendi gratiam.

Mentem gubernet et regat
casto, fideli corpore;
fides calore ferveat,
fraudis venena nesciat.

Christusque nobis sit cibus,
potusque noster sit fides;
laeti bibamus sobriam
ebrietatem Spiritus.

Laetus dies hic transeat;
pudor sit ut diluculum,
fides velut meridies,
crepusculum mens nesciat.

Aurora cursus provehit:
Aurora totus prodeat,
in Patre totus Filius
et totus in Verbo Pater.

Deo Patri sit gloria,
eiusque soli Filio,
cum Spiritu Paraclito,
nunc et per omne saeculum. Amen.

And here is the hymn according to the Pope Urban VIII’s changes made to the Breviary in 1632:

Splendor Paternae gloriae,
de luce lucem proferens,
lux lucis et fons luminis,
diem dies illuminans.

Verusque sol, illabere
micans nitore perpeti,
iubarque Sancti Spiritus
infunde nostris sensibus.

Votis vocemus et Patrem,
Patrem potentis gloriae,
Patrem perennis gratiae,
culpam releget lubricam.

Confirmet actus strenuos,
dentes retundat invidi,
casus secundet asperos,
agenda recte dirigat.

Mentem gubernet et regat
sit pura nobis castitatis;
fides calore ferveat,
fraudis venena nesciat.

Christusque nobis sit cibus,
potusque noster sit fides;
laeti bibamus sobriam
profusionem Spiritus.

Laetus dies hic transeat;
pudor sit ut diluculum,
fides velut meridies,
crepusculum mens nesciat.

Aurora lucem provehit,
cum luce nobis prodeat.
in Patre totus Filius
et totus in Verbo Pater.

Deo Patri sit gloria,
eiusque soli Filio,
cum Spiritu Paraclito,
nunc et per omne saeculum. Amen.

Posted in Ancient & Mediaeval Hymns, Hymns By The Greats, John Chandler, Latin Hymns, Morning, Non-English Hymns, Saints of the Church (Canonized or Beatified), St. Ambrose, The Hours of the Day | Leave a comment

In His Temple Now Behold Him

In His temple now behold Him,
See the long expected Lord;
Ancient prophets had foretold Him—
God has now fulfilled His word.
Now to praise Him, His redeemèd
Shall break forth with one accord.

In the arms of her who bore Him,
Virgin pure, behold Him lie,
While his agèd saints adore Him
Ere in faith and hope they die.
Hallelujah! Hallelujah!
Lo, th’incarnate God most high.

Jesus, by Thy presentation,
Thou, who didst for us endure,
Make us see our great salvation,
Seal us with Thy promise sure.
And present us in Thy glory
To Thy Father, cleansed and pure.

Prince and Author of salvation,
Be Thy boundless love our theme!
Jesus, praise to Thee be given
By the world Thou didst redeem.
With the Father and the Spirit,
Lord of majesty supreme!

Words: Henry J. Pye, 1851 (sts. 1-3); William Cooke, 1853 (st. 4).
Tune:Sieh, Hier Bin Ich,” from the Geist­reich­es Ge­sang­buch, 1698.

Posted in Major Feasts, The Church Year, The Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Feb. 2) | Leave a comment

To Jordan’s Stream The Savior Goes

To Jordan’s stream the Savior goes
To do His Father’s will,
His breast with sacred ardor glows,
Each precept to fulfill.

Behold Him buried in the flood,
The emblem of His grave,
Who from the bosom of His God
Came down, a world to save.

As from the water He ascends,
What miracles appear!
God with a voice His Son commends—
Let all the nations hear!

Ye youthful pilgrims, hear, rejoice—
Let this your courage raise:
What God approves, be this your choice,
And glory in His ways.

Words: Samuel Deacon Jr., 1785.
Tune:Richmond (Haweis)” Thomas Haweis, 1792.

Posted in Christmas, The Church Year, The Lord's Baptism | Leave a comment

This Day Let Solemn Strains

Today being the feast of St. Thomas Becket, here is the sequence hymn for his feast from the Sarum Missal:

This day let solemn strains
Resound on earth below,
And o’er the Martyr’s palm
Triumph the heavenly host.
What do ye, joyous folk?
Give thanks with them above.
Let every living soul rejoice,
And with free voice to Christ sing praise.
Let Canterbury at this feast
Devoutly homage pay.
The furious soldier band
Shouts forth the tyrant King’s command,
Lawless will and fierce decree
Forced their way full haughtily.
Armed men with passion wild
Places dear to Christ defiled;
But Christ’s footstep’s following,
Thomas with unswerving tread
Stood unshaken, undismayed,
In obedience to his King
Meets the sword with steady eye,
Counting it all gain to die.
*Thomas, rejoice, thy victory adds a lay
To swell the praise of Christ’s own Natal Day!*
The Martyr’s glory is proclaimed,
By divers signs assured,
Within the fane the Pastor Chief
A cruel death endured;
Nor day nor place from murderous hand
Awe or respect procured.
Star of the Sea! who didst rejoice to feed
Christ at thy holy breast,
Him do we humbly pray, that in the end we may
With Thomas surely rest,
And through his prayer be blest.

* This verse to be said thrice.

Words: Sarum Missal; tr. A. H. Pearson, 1868.

Here is the original Latin of this sequence hymn:

Solemne canticum hodie
resonet in terra.
Ad palmam martyris exultet
superum caterva.
Quid facis, turba iocunda?
Gratulare cum supera.
Iubilet mens lætabunda,
psallat Christo vox libera.
Colat et festa dominica
devota Cantuaria.
Intonat iussa tyrannical
turbulenta militia.
Diræ leges et mandata
insolerter sunt prolata.
Loca Christo consecrate
profanavit vis armata.
Sed Christi sic in vestigio
stabant Thomæ pedes recti,
ut nequirent inde flecti
In sui Regis obsequio
arbitratus lucrum mori,
caput offert percussori.

Iste sequens versus ter dicatur:
Gaude, Thoma, de cuius victoria
Ortus Christi cumulantur gaudia.

Martyris declaratur gloria
crebra per indicia;
Curantur per eius suffragia
languidorum millia.
Trucidatur flos pastorum
inter sanctuaria.
Nec diei nec locorum
obstat reverentia.
Stella maris, quæ lætaris
te lactasse Filium,
Hunc precamur assequamur
ut Thomæ consortium
Eius prece gloriosa.

Posted in Ancient & Mediaeval Hymns, Christmas, Latin Hymns, Non-English Hymns, Sequences, Sequences from the Sarum Missal, St. Thomas Becket (December 29), The Church Year, The Communion of Saints | Leave a comment

Of The Father’s Love Begotten

Of the Father’s love begotten, ere the worlds began to be,
He is Alpha and Omega, He the source, the ending He,
Of the things that are, that have been,
And that future years shall see, evermore and evermore!

At His Word the worlds were framèd; He commanded; it was done:
Heaven and earth and depths of ocean in their threefold order one;
All that grows beneath the shining
Of the moon and burning sun, evermore and evermore!

He is found in human fashion, death and sorrow here to know,
That the race of Adam’s children doomed by law to endless woe,
May not henceforth die and perish
In the dreadful gulf below, evermore and evermore!

O that birth forever blessèd, when the Virgin, full of grace,
By the Holy Ghost conceiving, bare the Savior of our race;
And the Babe, the world’s Redeemer,
First revealed His sacred Face, evermore and evermore!

This is He whom seers in old time chanted of with one accord;
Whom the voices of the prophets promised in their faithful word;
Now He shines, the long expected,
Let creation praise its Lord, evermore and evermore!

O ye heights of heaven adore Him; angel hosts, His praises sing;
Powers, dominions, bow before Him, and extol our God and King!
Let no tongue on earth be silent,
Every voice in concert sing, evermore and evermore!

Righteous judge of souls departed, righteous King of them that live,
On the Father’s throne exalted none in might with Thee may strive;
Who at last in vengeance coming
Sinners from Thy face shalt drive, evermore and evermore!

Thee let old men, thee let young men, thee let boys in chorus sing;
Matrons, virgins, little maidens, with glad voices answering:
Let their guileless songs re-echo,
And the heart its music bring, evermore and evermore!

Christ, to Thee with God the Father, and, O Holy Ghost, to Thee,
Hymn and chant with high thanksgiving, and unwearied praises be:
Honor, glory, and dominion,
And eternal victory, evermore and evermore!

Words: Aurelius Prudentius, 5th Century; tr. John Mason Neale, 1854 & Henry W. Baker, 1859.
Tune: Divinum Mysterium” 11th Century Sanctus trope.

Here is the original Latin of this hymn:

Corde natus ex parentis ante mundi exordium
A et O cognominatus, ipse fons et clausula
Omnium quae sunt, fuerunt, quaeque post futura sunt.

Ipse iussit et creata, dixit ipse et facta sunt,
Terra, caelum, fossa ponti, trina rerum machina,
Quaeque in his vigent sub alto solis et lunae globo.

Corporis formam caduci, membra morti obnoxia
Induit, ne gens periret primoplasti ex germine,
Merserat quem lex profundo noxialis tartaro.

O beatus ortus ille, virgo cum puerpera
Edidit nostram salutem, feta Sancto Spiritu,
Et puer redemptor orbis os sacratum protulit.

Psallat altitudo caeli, psallite omnes angeli,
Quidquid est virtutis usquam psallat in laudem Dei,
Nulla linguarum silescat, vox et omnis consonet.

Ecce, quem vates vetustis concinebant saeculis,
Quem prophetarum fideles paginae spoponderant,
Emicat promissus olim; cuncta conlaudent eum.

Macte iudex mortuorum, macte rex viventium,
Dexter in Parentis arce qui cluis virtutibus,
Omnium venturus inde iustus ultor criminum.

Te senes et te iuventus, parvulorum te chorus,
Turba matrum, virginumque, simplices puellulae,
Voce concordes pudicis perstrepant concentibus.

Tibi, Christe, sit cum Patre hagioque Pneumate
Hymnus, decus, laus perennis, gratiarum actio,
Honor, virtus, victoria, regnum aeternaliter.

Posted in Ancient & Mediaeval Hymns, Christmas, Hymns By The Greats, John Mason Neale, Latin Hymns, Non-English Hymns, The Church Year | Leave a comment

Maria Walks Amid the Thorn

Maria walks amid the thorn,
Kyrie eleison.
Maria walks amid the thorn,
Which seven years no leaf has born.
Jesus and Maria.

What ‘neath her heart doth Mary bear?
Kyrie eleison.
A little child doth Mary bear,
Beneath her heart He nestles there.
Jesus and Maria.

And as the two are passing near,
Kyrie eleison,
Lo! roses on the thorns appear,
Lo! roses on the thorns appear.
Jesus and Maria.

Words: Anonymous German, ca. 16th Century; tr. Henry S. Drinker, 20th Century.
Tune:Maria durch ein’n Dornwald ging ” Traditional German Carol.

Here is the original German:

Maria durch ein’n Dornwald ging,
Kyrieleison!
Maria durch ein’n Dornwald ging,
Der hat in sieb’n Jahr kein Laub getragen.
Jesus und Maria.

Was trug Maria unter ihrem Herzen?
Kyrieleison!
Ein kleines Kindlein ohne Schmerzen,
Das trug Maria unterm Herzen!
Jesus und Maria.

Da hab’n die Dornen Rosen getragen,
Kyrieleison!
Als das Kindlein durch den Wald getragen,
Da haben die Dornen Rosen getragen!
Jesus und Maria.

Wie soll dem Kind sein Name sein?
Kyrieleison!
Der Name, der soll Jesus sein,
Das war von Anfang der Name sein!
Jesus und Maria.

Wer soll dem Kind sein Täufer sein?
Kyrieleison!
Das soll der Sankt Johannes sein,
Der soll dem Kind sein Täufer sein!
Jesus und Maria.

Was kriegt das Kind zum Patengeld?
Kyrieleison!
Den Himmel und die ganze Welt,
Das kriegt das Kind zum Patengeld!
Jesus und Maria.

Wer hat erlöst die Welt allein?
Kyrieleison!
Das hat getan das Christkindlein,
Das hat erlöst die Welt allein!
Jesus und Maria!

And here is a beautiful rendition of the German version on youtube.

Here is another, apparently older, translation of this hymn. I have as yet been unable to locate the name of the translator.

Blest Mary wanders through the thorn,
Kyrie eleison!
Blest Mary wanders through the thorn,
That seven long years no bloom hath borne.
Jesu et Maria!

What clasps she to her breast so close?
Kyrie eleison!
An innocent child doth there repose,
Which to her breast she claspeth close.
Jesu et Maria!

Fair roses bloom on every tree,
Kyrie eleison!
As through the thorn-wood passeth she
Fair roses bloom on every tree.
Jesu et Maria!

What shall this Infant cal-led be?
Kyrie eleison!
The Christ, he shall be called truly,
Which Name he hath borne from eternity.
Jesu et Maria!

This holy Name, who shall proclaim?
Kyrie eleison!
Saint John Baptist shall do the same,
This holy Name he shall proclaim.
Jesu et Maria!

What christening-gifts to him are giv’n?
Kyrie eleison!
All things that be, the earth, the heav’n,
As christening-gifts to him are giv’n.
Jesu et Maria!

Who hath the world from sin set free?
Kyrie eleison!
This Child alone, and only he,
He hath the world from sin set free.
Jesu et Maria!

Posted in Advent, German Hymns, Non-English Hymns, The Church Year | Leave a comment