Glory Of Iberia’s Throne

his hymn is used for the Feast of St. Hermenegild in the Extraordinary Form. Part I is used for Vespers & Lauds. Part II is used for Matins.

Part I

Glory of Iberia’s throne!
Joy of Martyr’d Saints above!
Who the crown of life have won,
Dying for their Saviour’s love:

What intrepid faith was thine!
What unswerving constancy!
Bent to do the will divine
With exact fidelity!

Every rising motion check’d
Which might lead thy heart astray;
How thou didst thy course direct
Whither virtue shew’d the way!

Part II

From the Truth thy soul to turn,
Pleads a father’s voice in vain;
Nought to thee were jewell’d crown,
Earthly pleasure, earthly gain.

Angry threat and naked sword
Daunted not thy courage high;—
Choosing glory with the Lord,
Rather than a present joy.

Now amid the Saints in light,
Thron’d in bliss for evermore; —
Oh! from thy eternal height,
Hear the solemn prayer we pour.

*Honour, glory, majesty,
To the Father and the Son,
With the Holy Spirit be,
While eternal ages run.

Words: Pope Urban VIII, 1632.; tr. Fr. Edward Caswall, C.O., 1849.
Tune:St. Bees” John B. Dykes, 19th C.
Meter: 77.77

*This doxology is used at the end of each part in the Office

The original Latin text of this hymn may be found here.

Posted in Edward Caswall, English Translation of Non-English Hymn, Evening Prayer / Vespers, Hymns By The Greats, Matins/Office of Readings, Morning Prayer/Lauds, Non-English Hymns, Other Feast Days, Pope Urban VIII, Roman Breviary, St. Hermenegild (Apr. 13 (EF)), The Church Year, The Communion of Saints, The Holy Martyrs, The Liturgy of Hours/Hours of the Day, The Proper of Saints | 1 Comment

Regali Solio

This hymn is used for the Feast of St. Hermenegild in the Extraordinary Form. Part I is used for Vespers & Lauds. Part II is used for Matins.

PARS I

Regali solio fortis Iberiæ,
Hermenegilde iubar, gloria Martyrum,
Christi quos amor almis
Cæli cœtibus inserit.

Ut perstas patiens, pollicitum Deo
Servans obsequium! quo potius tibi
Nil proponis, et arces
Cautus noxia, quæ placent.

Ut motus cohibes, pabula qui parant
Surgentis vitii, non dubios agens
Per vestigia gressus,
Quo veri via dirigit!

PARS II

Nullis te genitor blanditiis trahit,
Non vitæ caperis divitis otio,
Gemmarumve nitore,
Regnandive cupidine.

Diris non acies te gladii minis,
Nee terret perimens carnificis furor:
Nam mansura caducis
Præfers gaudia cælitum.

Nunc nos e Superum protege sedibus
Clemens, atque preces, dum canimus tua
Quæsitam nece palmam,
Pronis auribus excipe.

*Sit rerum Domino iugis honor Patri,
Et Natum celebrent ora precantium,
Divinumque supremis
Flamen laudibus efferant. Amen

Words: Pope Urban VIII, 1632.
Tune: Unknown…
Meter: 12.12.7.8

*This doxology is used at the end of each part in the Office

This hymn has been translated into English as the following:
Glory of Iberia’s throne!

Posted in Evening Prayer / Vespers, Hymns By The Greats, Latin Hymns, Matins/Office of Readings, Morning Prayer/Lauds, Non-English Hymns, Other Feast Days, Pope Urban VIII, Roman Breviary, St. Hermenegild (Apr. 13 (EF)), The Church Year, The Communion of Saints, The Holy Martyrs, The Liturgy of Hours/Hours of the Day, The Proper of Saints, Tune to Be Determined | 1 Comment

God Moves In A Mysterious Way

This is the text of this hymn as it appeared in Reginald Heber’s “Hymns Written and Adapted to the Weekly Church Service of the Year” in 1827. It was listed there for the Third Sunday after Easter Sunday.

God moves in a mysterious way
His wonders to perform;
He plants His footsteps in the sea,
And rides upon the storm!

Deep in unfathomable mines
Of never-failing skill,
He treasures up His great designs,
And works His sovereign will.

Ye fearful saints, fresh courage take!
The clouds ye so much dread
Are big with mercy, and shall break
In blessings on your head!

Judge not the Lord by feeble sense,
But trust Him for his grace;
Behind a frowning Providence
He hides a smiling face.

His purposes will ripen fast,
Unfolding every hour;
The bud may have a bitter taste,
But sweet will be the flower.

Blind unbelief is sure to err,
And scan His works in vain;
God is His own interpreter,
And He will make it plain!

Words: William Cowper, 1774.
Tune:Dundee” Scottish Psalter, 1615.
Alternate Tune:Belmont” William Gardiner, 1812.
Meter: 88.88

Posted in Divine Providence, Easter, In Time of Distress and Discouragement, Praise to God, The Church Year, The Mighty Acts of God, Trust in God, William Cowper | Leave a comment

The Lord My Pasture Shall Prepare

This is the text of this hymn as it appeared in Reginald Heber’s “Hymns Written and Adapted to the Weekly Church Service of the Year” in 1827. It was listed there for the Second Sunday after Easter Sunday.

The Lord my pasture shall prepare,
And lead me with a shepherd’s care;
His presence shall my wants supply,
And guard me with a watchful eye;
My noon-day walks He shall attend,
And all my midnight hours defend.

Though in the paths of death I tread,
With gloomy horrors overspread,
My stedfast heart shall fear no ill,
For Thou, O God! art with me still:
Thy friendly crook shall give me aid,
And guide me through the dreadful shade.

Though in a bare and rugged way,
Through devious, lonely wilds, I stray,
Thy bounty shall my pains beguile;
The barren wilderness shall smile,
With sudden greens and verdure crown’d,
And streams shall murmur all around.

Words: Joseph Addison, 1712
Tune:Carey’s Surrey” Henry Carey, 1723.
Meter: 88.88.88

Posted in Easter, In Time of Distress and Discouragement, Praise to God, Psalms, The Church Year | Leave a comment

My Shepherd Is The Living Lord

This is the text of this hymn as it appeared in Reginald Heber’s “Hymns Written and Adapted to the Weekly Church Service of the Year” in 1827. It was listed there for the Second Sunday after Easter Sunday.

My Shepherd is the living Lord,
I therefore nothing need;
In pastures fair, near pleasant streams,
He setteth me to feed.

He shall convert and glad my soul,
And bring my mind in frame
To walk in paths of righteousness,
For His most holy name.

Yea, though I walk the vale of Death,
Yet will I fear no ill;
Thy rod and staff they comfort me,
And Thou art with me still.

And, in the presence of my foes,
My table Thou shalt spread;
Thou wilt fill full my cup, and Thou
Anointed hast my head.

Through all my life Thy favour is
So frankly shown to me,
That in Thy house for evermore
My dwelling-place shall be.

Words: Anonymous – listed as Old Version of Psalm 23 in Heber’s “Hymns Written and Adapted to the Weekly Church Service of the Year” in 1827.
Tune:Tallis’ Ordinal” Thomas Tallis, 16th C.
Meter: 86.86

Posted in Authorship Debated, Unknown, To Be Determined, Easter, In Time of Distress and Discouragement, Praise to God, Psalms, The Church Year | Leave a comment

Aurora Solis Nuntia

This hymn is used for Lauds for the Feast of St. Joseph the Worker in both Forms.

Aurora, solis nuntia
Florumque mensi prævia,
Fabri sonoram malleo
Domum salutat Nazaræ.

Salve, caput domesticum,
Sub quo supremus Artifex,
Sudore salso roridus,
Exercet artem patriam.

Altis locatus sedibus
Celsæque Sponsæ proximus,
Adesto nunc clientibus,
Quos vexat indigentia.

Absintque vis et iurgia,
Fraus omnis a mercedibus;
Victus cibique copiam
Mensuret una parcitas.

O Trinitatis Unitas,
Ioseph precante, quæsumus,
In pace nostros omnium
Gressus viamque dirige. Amen.

Words: Evaristus Antverpensis (d. 1968).
Tune: “Aurora Solis Nuntia” Gregorian Chant, Mode VIII, traditional.
Meter: 88.88

This hymn has been translated into English as the following:
—To my knowledge, this hymn has not been translated into English yet—

Posted in English Translation Needed, Latin Hymns, Morning Prayer/Lauds, Non-English Hymns, Other Feast Days, Roman Breviary, St. Joseph, St. Joseph the Worker (May 1), The Church Year, The Communion of Saints, The Liturgy of Hours/Hours of the Day, The Proper of Saints | Leave a comment

Te Pater Ioseph

This hymn is used for Matins/Office of Readings for the Feast of St. Joseph the Worker in both Forms.

Te, pater Ioseph, opifex colende,
Nazaræ felix latitans in umbra,
Vocibus magnis animisque plenis
Nocte canemus.

Regiam stirpem tenuemque victum
Mente fers æqua tacitusque portas,
Sacra dum multo manuum labore
Pignora nutris.

O Faber, sanctum speculum fabrorum,
Quanta das plebi documenta vitæ,
Ut labor sudans, ut et officina
Sanctificetur.

Qui carent escis, miseros foveto;
Tempera effrenos perimasque lites;
Mysticus Christus patriæ sub umbræ
Tegmine crescat.

Tu Deus trinus pariterque et unus,
Qui pater cunctis opifexque rerum,
Fac patrem Ioseph imitemur actu,
Morte imitemur. Amen.

Words: Evaristus Antverpensis (d. 1968).
Tune: “Te Pater Ioseph” Gregorian Chant, Mode VIII, traditional.
Meter: 11.11.11.5

This hymn has been translated into English as the following:
—To my knowledge, this hymn has not been translated into English yet—

Posted in English Translation Needed, Latin Hymns, Matins/Office of Readings, Non-English Hymns, Other Feast Days, Roman Breviary, St. Joseph, St. Joseph the Worker (May 1), The Church Year, The Communion of Saints, The Liturgy of Hours/Hours of the Day, The Proper of Saints, Tune to Be Determined | Leave a comment