God Ended All The World’s Array

This hymn is on the days of creation. The last thirteen stanzas are used as a hymn in and of themselves. John Mason Neale translates a portion of this hymn as a hymn for Saturday evening in his Hymnal Noted (1851).

This is the original text of this hymn as it appears in John Mason Neale’s Hymnal Noted (1851):

God ended all the world’s array,
And rested on the Seventh Day:
His holy voice proclaim’d it blest,
And nam’d it for the Sabbath rest.

And He Who death by death sub-dued,
And yesterday our life re-new’d,
On Satur-day His Sabbath kept,
As in the heart of earth He slept.

His servants, while they dwell be-low,
Six days of this world’s labour know:
Six days to bear the Cross have they,
And o’er Hell’s pow’rs to force their way.

But when the conflict shall be o’er,
And conquer’d sin can harm no more,
The soul, releas’d from fleshly chain,
Shall Life’s eternal Sabbath gain.

Then, then that Sunday shall ensue,
Whose end no eye shall ever view;
When this our flesh, from sin set free,
Shall put on immortality.

Then soul and body shall possess,
United, double blessedness;
When we the ramparts shall ascend
Of that bright realm which cannot end.

O Father, that we ask be done
Through Jesus Christ, Thine Only Son;
Who, with the Holy Ghost and Thee,
Shall live and reign eternally. Amen.

Words: St. Bede the Venerable, 672-735; tr. John Mason Neale, 1851.
Tune: “Aeterna Christi Munera (Rouen)” Rouen Church Melody.*
Meter: 8.8.8.8

*Neale provides several tunes from for this text – so far I do not know of where I could find a sound file demonstrating these tunes.

The original Latin text of this hymn (Post Facta Celsa Conditor) may be found here.

Advertisements
Posted in Ancient & Mediaeval Hymns, Days of the Week, English Translation of Non-English Hymn, Evening, Hymns By The Greats, John Mason Neale, Non-English Hymns, Praise to God, Sabbath/Saturday, Saints of the Church (Canonized or Beatified), St. Bede the Venerable, The Church Year, The Creation, The Mighty Acts of God, Times of Day | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Primo Deus Cæli Globum

This hymn is on the days of creation. The last thirteen stanzas are used as a hymn in and of themselves. John Mason Neale translates a portion of this hymn as a hymn for Saturday evening in his Hymnal Noted (1851).

This is the text as it appears in the Complete Works of Venerable Bede under the title “De Universis Dei Operibus”:

Primo Deus cæli globum
Molemque terræ condidit,
Terram sed umbris abditam
Abyssus alta texerat:

At per dies ætatibus
Labentis ævi congruos
Ornavit orbem, et æthera,
Cunctamque mundi machinam:

Prima Creator sæculi
Die tenebras effugans,
Aquis adhuc absconditum
Lampavit orbem lumine.

Lucis beatæ gaudiis
Mundi replevit incolas,
Ætate mox altissimus
Prima Creator sæculi

Locatur inter cærula
Dei secunda maximus
Poli globus: divisaque est
Utrinque lympha labilis.

Primo secundæ tempore
Ætatis arca mystica,
Hinc inde concurrentia
Locatur inter cærula.

Lucente sæcli tertia
Die, fluens sub æthere
Abyssus alta subsidet,
Virensque paret arida.

Electa proles Abrahæ
De perfidorum fluctibus,
Ætate florens claruit
Lucente sæcli tertia,

Quarta iubar sublimium
Die micabat siderum,
Polo soloque fulgidam
Lucis daturum gratiam.

Hebræa gens Davidico
Regno refulsit inclita,
Ætate pandens actuum
Quarta iubar sublimium.

Novum genus progignitur
Quinta die de limpidis
Nascens aquis natantium
Volantiumque sub polo.

Ætate quinta in Chaldæa,
Pœnam luente Iudæa,
Fidelium de perfidis
Novum genus progignitur.

Sexta creatus est homo,
Dei Creatoris sui
Imaginem qui præferens
Semper beatus viveret.

Summus creator omnium,
Per quem creatus est homo,
Ætate filius Dei,
Sexta creatus est homo,

Obdormienti splendida
Plasmatur Adæ fœmina,
Os illius ex ossibus,
Ex carne carnem proferens.

De carne Christo propria,
Et sanguinis mysterio
Iam sponsa nata est in cruce
Obdormienti splendida.

Post facta celsa conditor
Die quiescens septima,
Eam vocari in sæcula
Et esse iubet sabbatum.

Ætas quietis septima
Post hoc futurum est sæculum,
Qua sabbatizat cum suis
Post facta celsa conditor.

Octava restat ceteris
Ætatibus sublimior,
Cum mortui de pristino
Terræ resurgent aggere,

Vultumque Christi perpetes
Iusti vident amabilem,
Eruntque sicut angeli
Cælesti in arce fulgidi,

Quam nobis ad se semitam
Ostendit ipse prævius
De matre natus virgine
Deus Deique filius.

Nam morte mortem destruens
Sexta subegit
Quievit ast in sabbato,
In corde terræ conditus:

Vitæque prima sabbati
Surgendo pandit ianuam,
Suisque congaudentibus
Ascendit ad thronum patris.

Et sex in huius sæculi
Ætatibus nos præcipit,
Nostram ferendo iam crucem
Ius omne leti vincere.

Intrabimus post omnia
Devicta mundi prælia,
Carnis soluti vinculis
Vitæ perennis sabbatum.

Sequetur una Sabbati
Claudenda nullo termino,
Cum carnis immortalitas
Æterna nobis redditur.

Sic carnis atque spiritus
Bino potiti gaudio,
Scandemus ad cælestia
Regni perennis mœnia.

Quo nos venire quæsumus,
Concede, sancta Trinitas,
Unumque te cognoscere
Verum Deum per sæcula.

Gloria, &c.

Words: St. Bede the Venerable, 672-735.
Tune: Chant Tone unknown.
Meter: 8.8.8.8

This cento is used as the separate hymn “Post Facta Celsa Conditor”:

Post facta celsa conditor
Die quiescens septima,
Eam vocari in sæcula
Et esse iubet sabbatum.

Ætas quietis septima
Post hoc futurum est sæculum,
Qua sabbatizat cum suis
Post facta celsa conditor.

Octava restat ceteris
Ætatibus sublimior,
Cum mortui de pristino
Terræ resurgent aggere,

Vultumque Christi perpetes
Iusti vident amabilem,
Eruntque sicut angeli
Cælesti in arce fulgidi,

Quam nobis ad se semitam
Ostendit ipse prævius
De matre natus virgine
Deus Deique filius.

Nam morte mortem destruens
Sexta subegit
Quievit ast in sabbato,
In corde terræ conditus:

Vitæque prima sabbati
Surgendo pandit ianuam,
Suisque congaudentibus
Ascendit ad thronum patris.

Et sex in huius sæculi
Ætatibus nos præcipit,
Nostram ferendo iam crucem
Ius omne leti vincere.

Intrabimus post omnia
Devicta mundi prælia,
Carnis soluti vinculis
Vitæ perennis sabbatum.

Sequetur una Sabbati
Claudenda nullo termino,
Cum carnis immortalitas
Æterna nobis redditur.

Sic carnis atque spiritus
Bino potiti gaudio,
Scandemus ad cælestia
Regni perennis mœnia.

Quo nos venire quæsumus,
Concede, sancta Trinitas,
Unumque te cognoscere
Verum Deum per sæcula.

Gloria, &c.

This hymn has been translated into English as the following:
God Ended All The World’s Array

Posted in Ancient & Mediaeval Hymns, Chant Tone Unknown, Days of the Week, Evening, Hymns By The Greats, Latin Hymns, Non-English Hymns, Praise to God, Sabbath/Saturday, Saints of the Church (Canonized or Beatified), St. Bede the Venerable, The Church Year, The Creation, The Mighty Acts of God, Times of Day, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

O What Their Joy And Their Glory Must Be

According to In Liturgy and Song, this hymn was written by Peter Abelard for Vespers I of Sunday on Saturday evening in the Hymnarius Paraclitensis, but the song has more recently become associated with the Solemnity of All Saints on November 1.

This is the original text of this hymn as it appears in John Mason Neale’s Hymnal Noted (1851):

O what their joy and their glory must be,—
Those endless Sabbaths blessed ones see!
Crown for the valiant: to weary ones rest:
God shall be all, and in all ever blest.

What are the Monarch, His court, and His throne?
What are the peace and the joy that they own?
Tell us, ye blest ones, that in it have share,
If what ye feel ye can fully declare.

Truly “Jerusalem” name we that shore,
“Vision of Peace” that brings joy evermore!
Wish and fulfilment can sever’d be ne’er;
Nor the thing pray’d for come short of the pray’r.

We, where no trouble distraction can bring,
Safely the anthems of Sion shall sing:
While for Thy grace, Lord, their voices of praise
Thy blessed people shall evermore raise.

There dawns no Sabbath, — no Sabbath is o’er;
Those Sabbath-keep-ers have one, and no more;
One and unending is that triumph-song
Which to the Angels and us shall belong.

Now in the meanwhile, with hearts rais’d on high,
We for that Country must yearn and must sigh:
Seeking Jerusalem, dear native land,
Through our long exile on Babylon’s strand.

Low before Him with our praises we fall,
Of Whom, and in Whom, and through Whom are all:
Of Whom,—the Father; and in Whom,—the Son;
Through Whom,—the Spirit, with These ever one. Amen.

Words: Peter Abelard, 12th C.; tr. John Mason Neale, 1851.
Tune: “O Quanta Qualia” Gregorian Chant.*
Alternate Tune: “O Quanta Qualia” Paris Antiphoner, 1681.

Meter: 12.12.12.12

*Neale provides several tunes from for this text – so far I do not know of where I could find a sound file demonstrating these tunes.

The original Latin text of this hymn may be found here.

Posted in All Saints (November 1), Ancient & Mediaeval Hymns, Breviaries, Days of the Week, English Translation of Non-English Hymn, Evening Prayer / Vespers, Holy Mother Church, Holy Saturday, Hymns By The Greats, John Mason Neale, Major Feasts, Non-English Hymns, Offices of the Breviary, Other Breviaries, Peter Abelard, Sabbath/Saturday, Sunday, The Church Triumphant/The Heavenly Jerusalem, The Church Year, The Communion of Saints, The Liturgy of Hours/Breviary, The Liturgy of the Church | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

O Quanta Qualia Sunt Illa Sabbata

According to In Liturgy and Song, this hymn was written by Peter Abelard for Vespers I of Sunday on Saturday evening in the Hymnarius Paraclitensis, but the song has more recently become associated with the Solemnity of All Saints on November 1.

This is the text of this hymn as it appears in Hymns of the Church Old and New (1912):

O quanta qualia sunt illa sabbata,
Quæ semper celebrat superna curia,
Quæ fessis requies, quæ merces fortibus,
Cum erit omnia Deus in omnibus!

Quis rex, quæ curia, quale palatium,
Quæ pax, quæ requies, quod illud gaudium!
Huius participes exponant gloriæ,
Si, quantum sentiunt, possint exprimere.

Vere Ierusalem illic est civitas,
Cuius pax iugis est summa iucunditas,
Ubi non prævenit rem desiderium,
Nec desiderio minus est præmium.

Illic molestiis finitis omnibus
Securi cantica Sion cantabimus,
Et iuges gratias de donis gratiæ
Beata referet plebs tibi, Domine.

Illic ex sabbato succedit sabbatum,
Perpes lætitia sabbatizantium,
Nec ineffabiles cessabunt iubili,
Quos decantabimus et nos et angeli.

Nostrum est interim mentem erigere
Et totis patriam votis appetere,
Et ad Ierusalem a Babylonia
Post longa regredi tandem exilia.

Perenni Domino perpes sit gloria,
Ex quo sunt, per quem sunt, in quo sunt omnia;
Ex quo sunt, Pater est, per quem sunt, Filius,
In quo sunt Patris et Filii Spiritus. Amen.

Words: Peter Abelard, 12th C.
Tune:O Quanta Qualia” Gregorian Chant.
Alternate Tune:O Quanta Qualia” Paris Antiphoner, 1681.

Meter: 12.12.12.12

This hymn has been translated into English as the following:
O What Their Joy And Their Glory Must Be

Posted in All Saints (November 1), Breviaries, Days of the Week, Evening Prayer / Vespers, Holy Mother Church, Hymns By The Greats, Major Feasts, Offices of the Breviary, Other Breviaries, Peter Abelard, Sabbath/Saturday, Sunday, The Church Triumphant/The Heavenly Jerusalem, The Church Year, The Liturgy of Hours/Breviary, The Liturgy of the Church | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Appendix From Part I Of Neale’s Hymnal Noted

This is the original text of this hymn as it appears in John Mason Neale’s Hymnal Noted (1851):

N. B.—In the Hymns for the third, sixth, and ninth hours, the following Doxotogies
may be said, at different seasons, in the place of that used in ordinary:

From CHRISTMAS till the PURIFICATION, inclusive;
(except during Epiphany-tide.)
All honour, laud, and glory be,
O Jesu, Virgin-born, to Thee!
All glory, as is ever meet,
To Father and to Paraclete. Amen.

On the EPIPHANY: and Seven Days after.
All glory, Lord, to Thee, we pay,
For Thine Epiphany today,
All glory, as is ever meet,
To Father and to Paraclete. Amen.

From EASTER till ASCENSION-DAY.
To Thee Who, dead, again dost live,
All glory Lord, Thy people give;
All glory, as is ever meet,
To Father and to Paraclete. Amen.

From ASCENSION-DAY till WHIT-SUNDAY.
All glory, Lord, to Thee we pay,
Ascending o’er the stars to-day;
All glory, as is ever meet,
To Father and to Paraclete. A-men.

On WHIT-SUNDAY, and Seven Days after.
To God the Father, God the Son,
And God the Spirit, praise be done:
And Christ the Lord upon us send,
The Spirit’s Gift, world without end. Amen.

Words: John Mason Neale, 1851.
Tune: See note below.*
Meter: 8.8.8.8

*Neale provides several tunes from for this text – so far I do not know of where I could find a sound file demonstrating these tunes – the second set of tunes for these doxologies have the following note: The Doxologies for different Seasons, set to the Melody for High Festivals, from the “Directory of Guidetti.”.

The above texts based on Neale’s notes apply to the following hymns:
Come, Holy Ghost, With God The Son (Third Hour/Terce)
O God of Truth, O Lord of Might (Sixth Hour/Sext)
O God, Creation’s Secret Force (Ninth Hour/None)

Posted in Appendix, Breviaries, Hymns By The Greats, John Mason Neale, Minor Offices, None, Offices of the Breviary, Sext, Special Doxologies, Terce, The Liturgy of Hours/Breviary, The Liturgy of the Church | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Thou, Heav’nly, New Jerusalem

This hymn is used for Vespers & Matins for the Common of the Dedication of a Church in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Breviary and for Vespers of the same Office in the Ordinary Form. Fr. Britt indicates this hymn continues as Angularis Fundamentum. It was used for Vespers I for the Dedication of a Church in the Paris Breviary (1736). It was also used for Vespers I and Matins for the Office of the Dedication of a Church in the Sarum Breviary.

This is the original text of this hymn as it appears in John Mason Neale’s Hymnal Noted (1851):

Thou, Heav’nly, new Jerusalem,
Vision of peace in prophet’s dream!
With living stones built up on high,
And rising to you starry sky;
In bridal pomp thy form is crowned,
With thousand thousand angels round!

O Bride! betrothed in happy hour,
Thy Father’s glory is thy dower;
Thy Bridegroom’s grace is shed on Thee,
Thou Queen all fair eternally!
To Christ allied, thy Prince ador’d,
Bright shining city of the Lord!

Behold, with pearls they glitt’ring stand,
Thy peaceful gates to all expand
By grace and strength divinely shed,
Each mortal thither may be led,
Who, kindled by Christ’s love, will dare
All earthly suff’rings now to bear!

By many a salutary stroke,
By many a weary blow, that broke,
Or polished with a workman’s skill,
The stones that form that glorious pile,
They all are fitly framed to lie
In their appointed place on high!

Fair and well pleasing in thy sight,
Parent most High, enthroned in light!
And for Thine Only Son most meet,
And Thee, all glorious Paraclete:
To Whom praise, power, and glory rise,
For ever through th’eternal skies. Amen.

Words: Anonymous Latin 6th or 7th Century; tr. John Mason Neale, 1851.
Tune: “Strasburg” Strasburg Psalter, 1525.*
Meter: 8.8.8.8.8.8

*Neale provides a tune for this text – so far I do not know of where I could find a sound file demonstrating this tune.

The original Latin text of this hymn (Cælestis Urbs Ierusalem) may be found here.

Posted in Ancient & Mediaeval Hymns, Authorship Debated, Unknown, To Be Determined, Breviaries, Dedication of A Church, English Translation of Non-English Hymn, Evening Prayer / Vespers, Holy Mother Church, Hymns By The Greats, John Mason Neale, Matins/Office of Readings, Non-English Hymns, Offices of the Breviary, Paris Breviary, Roman Breviary, Sarum Breviary, Subsections of Breviaries, The Church Triumphant/The Heavenly Jerusalem, The Liturgy of Hours/Breviary, The Liturgy of the Church | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Thee, O Christ, The Father’s Splendour

This hymn is used for the Vespers & Matins on the Feast of St. Michael (Sept. 29) in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Breviary . It is used for Lauds on the same Feast in the Ordinary Form. I was also used for Vespers I (what would be Vespers II was Vespers for St. Jerome) and Matins on the Feast of St. Michael in the Sarum Breviary.

This is the original text of this hymn as it appears in John Mason Neale’s Hymnal Noted (1851):

Thee, O Christ, the Father’s Splendour,
Life and virtue of the heart,
In the presence of the Angels
Sing we now with tuneful art:
Meetly in alternate chorus
Bearing our responsive part.

Thus we praise with veneration
All the armies of the sky;
Chiefly him, the warrior Primate
Of Celestial chivalry:
Michael, who in princely virtue,
Cast Abaddon from on high.

By whose watchful cares repelling,
King of everlasting grace!
Ev’ry ghostly adversary,
All things evil, all things base;
Grant us of Thine only goodness
In Thy Paradise a place.

Laud and honour to the Father,
Laud and honour to the Son:
Laud and honour to the Spirit,
Ever Three, and Ever One:
Consubstantial, Co-eternal,
While unending ages run. Amen.

Words: attr. Rabanus Maurus, ca. 9th C.; tr. John Mason Neale, 1851.
Tune: “Tibi Christe Splendor Patris” Gregorian Chant, Mode II, traditional.*
Alternate Tune:Unser Herrscher” Joachim Neander, 1680.
Meter: 8.7.8.7.8.7

*Neale provides a tune from The Salisbury Hymnal for this text – so far I do not know of where I could find a sound file demonstrating this tune.

The original Latin text of this hymn may be found here.

Posted in Ancient & Mediaeval Hymns, Breviaries, English Translation of Non-English Hymn, Evening Prayer / Vespers, Hymns By The Greats, John Mason Neale, Major Feasts, Matins/Office of Readings, Morning Prayer/Lauds, Non-English Hymns, Offices of the Breviary, Rabanus Maurus, Roman Breviary, Sarum Breviary, SS. Michael, Gabriel & Raphael (Sept. 29), Subsections of Breviaries, The Church Year, The Communion of Saints, The Holy Angels, The Holy Archangels, The Liturgy of Hours/Breviary, The Liturgy of the Church, The Proper of Saints | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment