The Lord My Maker, Forming Me of Clay

This hymn is a translation of the stichera for the First Vespers of Cheesefare Sunday (Quinquagesima). Dr. Neale entitles it “Adam’s Complaint.”

Here is the original text as it appears in the first edition of Hymns of the Eastern Church (1862). There are no significant variations in the text as it appears in the fifth edition:

“The LORD my Maker, forming me of clay,
By His own Breath the breath of life convey’d:
O’er all the bright new world He gave me sway,—
A little lower than the Angels made.
But Satan, using for his guile
The crafty serpent’s cruel wile,
Deceiv’d me by the Tree;
And severed me from God and grace,
And wrought me death, and all my race,
As long as time shall be.
O Lover of the sons of men!
Forgive, and call me back again!

“In that same hour I lost the glorious stole
Of innocence, that God’s own Hands had made;
And now the tempter poisoning all my soul,
I sit, in fig leaves and in skins arrayed:
I sit condemn’d, distress’d, forsaken;
Must till the ground whence I was taken
By labour’s daily sweat.
But Thou, That shalt hereafter come,
The Offspring of a Virgin-womb,
Have pity on me yet!
O turn on me those gracious eyes,
And call me back to Paradise!

“O glorious Paradise! O lovely clime!
O God-built mansions! Joy of every Saint!
Happy remembrance to all coming time!
Whisper, with all thy leaves, in cadence faint,
One prayer to Him Who made them all,
One prayer for Adam in his fall! —
That He, Who formed thy gates of yore,
Would bid those gates unfold once more
That I had closed by sin:
And let me taste that holy Tree
That giveth immortality
To them that dwell therein!
Or have I fallen so far from grace
That mercy hath for me no place?”

Adam sat right against the Eastern gate,
By many a storm of sad remembrance tost:
“O me! so ruined by the serpent’s hate!
O me! so glorious once, and now so lost!
So mad that bitter lot to choose!
Beguil’d of all I had to lose!
Must I then, gladness of my eyes,—
Must I then leave thee, Paradise,
And as an exile go?
And must I never cease to grieve
How once my God, at cool of eve,
Came down to walk below?
O Merciful! on Thee I call:
O Pitiful! forgive my Fall! ”

Words: St. Theophanes the Confessor, 759-818; tr. John Mason Neale, 1862.
Tune: No tunes seem to exist for this song.
Meter: Irreg.

Here is the entire set of Greek stichera/idiomela for the First Vespers of Cheesefare Sunday (Saturday Evening)(Quinquagesima) whence this hymn is taken:

Στιχηρὰ προσόμοια τοῦ Τριῳδίου 
Ἦχος πλ. β’ 
Ὅλην ἀποθέμενοι 
Ὁ πλάστης μου Κύριος, χοῦν ἐκ τῆς γῆς προσλαβών με, ζωηρῷ φυσήματι, ψυχώσας ἐζώωσε καὶ ἐτίμησεν, ἐπὶ γῆς ἄρχοντα, ὁρατῶν ἁπάντων, καὶ Ἀγγέλοις ὁμοδίαιτον. Σατὰν δ΄ ὁ δόλιος, ὀργάνῳ τῷ ὄφει χρησάμενος, ἐν βρώσει ἐδελέασε, καὶ Θεοῦ τῆς δόξης ἐχώρισε, καὶ τῷ κατωτάτῳ, θανάτῳ παραδέδωκεν εἰς γῆν. Ἀλλ’ ὡς Δεσπότης καὶ εὔσπλαγχνος, πάλιν ἀνακάλεσαι.
Ἦχος πλ. β’ 
Στολὴν θεοΰφαντον, ἀπεξεδύθην ὁ τάλας, σοῦ τὸ θεῖον πρόσταγμα, παρακούσας Κύριε, συμβουλίᾳ ἐχθροῦ· καὶ συκῆς φύλλα δέ, καί τοὺς δερματίνους, νῦν χιτῶνας περιβέβλημαι· ἱδρῶτι κέκριμαι· ἄρτον μοχθηρὸν κατεσθίειν γάρ, ἀκάνθας καὶ τριβόλους δέ, φέρειν μοι ἡ γῆ κεκατήραται. Ἀλλ’ ὁ ἐν ὑστέροις, τοῖς χρόνοις ἐκ Παρθένου σαρκωθείς, ἀνακαλέσας εἰσάγαγε, πάλιν εἰς Παράδεισον.
Ἦχος πλ. β’ 
Παράδεισε πάντιμε, τὸ ὡραιότατον κάλλος, θεόκτιστον σκήνωμα, εὐφροσύνη ἄληκτε, καὶ ἀπόλαυσις, δόξα τῶν Δικαίων, Προφητῶν τερπνότης, καὶ Ἁγίων οἰκητήριον, ἤχῳ τῶν φύλλων σου, Πλάστην τὸν τῶν ὅλων ἱκέτευε, τὰς πύλας ὑπανοῖξαί μοι, ἃς τῇ παραβάσει ἀπέκλεισα· καὶ ἀξιωθῆναι, τοῦ ξύλου τῆς ζωῆς μεταλαβεῖν, καὶ τῆς χαρᾶς, ἧς τὸ πρότερον, ἐν σοὶ κατετρύφησα.
Ἦχος πλ. β’ 
Ἀδὰμ ἐξωστράκισται, παρακοῇ Παραδείσου, καὶ τρυφῆς ἐκβέβληται, γυναικὸς τοῖς ῥήμασιν ἀπατώμενος, καὶ γυμνὸς κάθηται, τοῦ χωρίου οἴμοι! ἐναντίον ὀδυρόμενος. Διὸ σπουδάσωμεν, πάντες τὸν καιρὸν ὑποδέξασθαι, νηστείας ὑπακούοντες, εὐαγγελικῶν παραδόσεων, ἵνα διὰ τούτων, εὐάρεστοι γενόμενοι Χριστῷ, τοῦ Παραδείσου τὴν οἴκησιν, πάλιν ἀπολάβωμεν.
Δόξα… Ἦχος πλ. β’ 
Ἐκάθισεν Ἀδάμ, ἀπέναντι τοῦ Παραδείσου, καὶ τὴν ἰδίαν γύμνωσιν θρηνῶν ὠδύρετο. Οἴμοι, τὸν ἀπάτῃ πονηρᾷ πεισθέντα καὶ κλαπέντα, καὶ δόξης μακρυνθέντα! οἴμοι, τὸν ἁπλότητι γυμνόν, νῦν δὲ ἠπορημένον! Ἀλλ᾽ ὦ Παράδεισε, οὐκέτι σου τῆς τρυφῆς ἀπολαύσω, οὐκέτι ὄψομαι τὸν Κύριον καὶ Θεόν μου καὶ Πλάστην· εἰς γῆν γάρ ἀπελεύσομαι, ἐξ ἧς καὶ προσελήφθην. Ἐλεῆμον, Οἰκτίρμον, βοῶ σοι· Ἐλέησόν με τὸν παραπεσόντα.

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Posted in Ancient & Mediaeval Hymns, Byzantine and Other Eastern Liturgies, Byzantine Liturgy, English Translation of Non-English Hymn, Greek Hymns, Horologion, Hymns By The Greats, John Mason Neale, Lamentations, No Tunes Exist For Hymn, Non-English Hymns, Penitential Hymns, Pre-Lent (EF), Quinquagesima Sunday, Saints of the Church (Canonized or Beatified), St. Theophanes the Confessor, The Church Year, The Fall of Man, The Liturgy of the Church, Triodion, Vespers | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Hither, And With One Accord

This hymn is a translation of the stichera for the Friday of Tyrophagus/Tyrini, known in English as Cheesefare week (Quinquagesima) according to Dr. Neale. Greek liturgical texts list these as the stichera for Vespers at the beginning of Saturday – that is Friday Evening.

Here is the original text as it appears in the first edition of Hymns of the Eastern Church (1862). There are no significant variations in the text as it appears in the fifth edition:

Hither, and with one accord,
Sing the servants of the Lord:
Sing each great ascetic sire;—
Anthony shall lead the choir:
Let Euthymius next him stand;
Then, in order, all the band.
Make we joyous celebration
Of their heavenly conversation;
Of their glory, how they rise,
Like another Paradise:
These the trees our God hath plac’d,
Trees, with fruit immortal grac’d ;
Bringing forth, for Christ on high,
Flowers of Life that cannot die;
With the sweetness that they fling
Mortal spirits nourishing.
Filled with God, and ever blest,
For our pardon make request!

Egypt, hail, thou faithful strand!
Hail, thou holy Libyan land!
Nurturing for the realm on high
Such a glorious company!
They by many a toil intense,
Chastity and continence,
Perfect men to God upreared,
Stars to guide us have appeared:
They, by many a glorious sign,
Many a beam of Power Divine,
To the earth’s remotest shore
Far and wide their radiance pour.
Holy Fathers, bright and blest,
For our pardon make request!

By what skill of mortal tongue
Shall your wondrous acts be sung?
All the conflicts of the soul,
All your struggles towards the goal;
And your virtues’ prize immense,
And your victories over sense,
How perpetual watch ye kept
Over passion, prayed and wept:
Yea, like very angels came,
Visible in earthly frame,
And with Satan girt for fight
Utterly o’erthrew his might.
Fam’d for signs and wonders rare,
Join to ours, great Saints, your prayer:
Ask that we, ye ever blest,
May attain the Land of Rest!

Words: St. Theophanes the Confessor, 759-818; tr. John Mason Neale, 1862.
Tune: No tunes seem to exist for this song.
Meter: Irreg.

Here is the entire set of Greek stichera/idiomela for the Vespers of Saturday (Friday Evening) for Cheesefare week (Quinquagesima). This hymn is taken from the first three stichera shown below:

Στιχηρὰ 
Ἦχος πλ. δ’ 
Δεῦτε ἅπαντες πιστοὶ
Δεῦτε ἅπαντες πιστοί, τὰς τῶν ὁσίων Πατέρων, χορείας ὑμνήσωμεν, Ἀντώνιον τὸν Κορυφαῖον, τὸν φαεινὸν Εὐθύμιον, καὶ ἕκαστον, καὶ πάντας ὁμοῦ, καὶ τούτων ὥσπερ Παράδεισον, ἄλλον τρυφῆς, τὰς πολιτείας νοητῶς διεξερχόμενοι, τερπνῶς ἀνακράξωμεν. Ταῦτα τὰ ξύλα, ἃ ἐφύτευσεν ὁ Θεὸς ἡμῶν, τὰ αὐτά, τοὺς ἀφθάρτους καρπούς τῆς ζωῆς ἐξανθήσαντα, προσήγαγον τῷ Χριστῷ, ἐκτρέφοντα ἡμῶν τὰς ψυχάς, πρὸς οὓς βοήσωμεν· θεοφόροι μακάριοι, πρεσβεύσατε, τοῦ σωθῆναι ἡμᾶς. (Δίς)
Ἦχος πλ. δ’ 
Χαῖρε Αἴγυπτε πιστή, χαῖρε Λιβύη ὁσία, χαῖρε Θηβαῒς ἐκλεκτή, χαῖρε πᾶς τόπος, καὶ πόλις καὶ χώρα, ἡ τοὺς πολίτας θρέψασα, τῆς Βασιλείας τῶν οὐρανῶν, καὶ τούτους ἐν ἐγκρατείᾳ, καὶ πόνοις αὐξήσασα, καὶ τῶν ἐπιθυμιῶν, τελείους ἄνδρας τῷ Θεῷ, ἀναδείξασα, οὗτοι, φωστῆρες τῶν ψυχῶν ἡμῶν ἀνεφάνησαν, οἱ αὐτοὶ τῶν θαυμάτων τῇ αἴγλῃ, καὶ τῶν ἔργων τοῖς τέρασιν, ἐξέλαμψαν νοητῶς, εἰς τὰ πέρατα ἅπαντα. Αὐτοῖς βοήσωμεν· Πατέρες παμμακάριστοι, πρεσβεύσατε, τοῦ σωθῆναι ἡμᾶς. (Δίς)
Ἦχος πλ. δ’ 
Τίς ἐξείποι γηγενῶν, τοὺς θαυμαστοὺς ὑμῶν βίους, Πατέρες παγκόσμιοι; ποία δὲ γλῶσσα λαλήσει, τοὺς ἱεροὺς ἐν Πνεύματι ἀγῶνας, καὶ ἱδρῶτας ὑμῶν, τὰ ἆθλα τῶν ἀρετῶν, τὴν τῆξιν τοῦ σώματος, τὰς παλαίστρας τῶν παθῶν, ἐν ἀγρυπνίαις καὶ εὐχαῖς, καὶ τοῖς δάκρυσιν, ὑμεῖς ἐν κόσμῳ, ὥσπερ Ἄγγελοι ὄντως ὤφθητε, οἱ αὐτοί, τὰς δαιμόνων δυνάμεις, τελείως καθείλετε, τελέσαντες θαυμαστά, καὶ ἐξαίσια τέρατα. Διὸ πρεσβεύσατε, σὺν ἡμῖν παμμακάριστοι, τυχεῖν ἡμᾶς τῆς ἀλήκτου χαρᾶς. (Δίς)
Δοξαστικὸν 
Ἦχος πλ. β’ 
Τὸ κατ’ εἰκόνα, τηρήσαντες ἀλώβητον, νοῦν ἡγεμόνα, κατὰ παθῶν ὀλεθρίων, ἀσκητικῶς ἐνστησάμενοι, εἰς τὸ καθ’ ὁμοίωσιν ὡς δυνατὸν ἀνεληλύθατε· ἀνδρικῶς γάρ τὴν φύσιν ἐκβιασάμενοι, ἐσπεύσατε τὸ χεῖρον καθυποτάξαι τῷ κρείττονι, καὶ τὴν σάρκα δουλῶσαι τῷ Πνεύματι· ὅθεν μοναζόντων, ἀνεδείχθητε ἀκρότης, πολισταὶ τῆς ἐρήμου, εὐδρομούντων ἀλεῖπται, κανόνες ἀρετῆς ἀκριβέστατοι. Καὶ νῦν ἐν οὐρανοῖς, τῶν ἐσόπτρων λυθέντων Πανόσιοι, καθαρῶς ἐποπτεύετε, τὴν ἁγίαν Τριάδα, ἐντυγχάνοντες ἀμέσως, ὑπὲρ τῶν πίστει καὶ πόθῳ τιμώντων ὑμᾶς.

Posted in Ancient & Mediaeval Hymns, Byzantine and Other Eastern Liturgies, Byzantine Liturgy, Confessors, English Translation of Non-English Hymn, Greek Hymns, Hymns By The Greats, John Mason Neale, Monastics/Religious, No Tunes Exist For Hymn, Non-English Hymns, Penitential Hymns, Pre-Lent (EF), Quinquagesima Sunday, Saints of the Church (Canonized or Beatified), St. Theophanes the Confessor, The Church Fathers, The Church Year, The Communion of Saints, The Desert Fathers, The Liturgy of the Church, Triodion, Vespers | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Jesu, Lord Of Life And Glory

This is the text of this hymn as it appears in The English Hymnal (1906) where it is listed as a hymn for Lent:

Jesu, Lord of life and glory,
Bend from heaven thy gracious ear;
While our waiting souls adore thee,
Friend of helpless sinners, hear:
By thy mercy,
O deliver us, good Lord.

Taught by thine unerring Spirit
Boldly we draw nigh to God,
Only in thy spotless merit,
Only through thy precious Blood:
By thy mercy,
O deliver us, good Lord.

From the depth of nature’s blindness,
From the hardening power of sin,
From all malice and unkindness,
From the pride that lurks within :
By thy mercy,
O deliver us, good Lord.

When temptation sorely presses,
In the day of Satan’s power,
In our times of deep distresses,
In each dark and trying hour:
By thy mercy,
O deliver us, good Lord.

In the weary hours of sickness,
In the times of grief and pain,
When we feel our mortal weakness,
When the creature’s help is vain:
By thy mercy,
O deliver us, good Lord.

In the solemn hour of dying,
In the awful judgement day,
May our souls, on thee relying,
Find thee still our rock and stay:
By thy mercy,
O deliver us, good Lord.

Jesu, may thy promised blessing
Comfort to our souls afford;
May we now, thy love possessing,
And at length our full reward,
Ever praise thee,
Thee, our ever-glorious Lord.

Words: James J. Cummins, 1839.
Tune (The English Hymnal):St. Raphael” E.J. Hopkins, 1818-1901.
Alternate Tune (The English Hymnal):Llanilar” Welsh Hymn Melody.

Meter: 8.7.8.7.4.7

Posted in In Time of Distress and Discouragement, Lent, Penitential Hymns, The Christian Life And Mission, The Church Year | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

O Jesu Christ, From Thee Began

This hymn was used for Lauds from the Third Sunday of Lent to Passion Sunday in the Sarum Breviary.

This is the original text of this hymn as it appears in The English Hymnal (1906). It is listed as the Morning Office Hymn from the 3rd Sunday of Lent until Passion Sunday:

O Jesu Christ, from thee began
This healing for the soul of man,
By fasting sought, by fasting found,
Through forty days of yearly round;

That he who fell from high delight,
Borne down to sensual appetite,
By dint of stern control may rise
To climb the hills of Paradise.

Therefore behold thy Church, O Lord,
And grace of penitence accord
To all who seek with generous tears
Renewal of their wasted years.

Forgive the sin that we have done,
Forgive the course that we have run,
And show henceforth in evil day
Thyself our succour and our stay.

But now let every heart prepare,
By sacrifice of fast and prayer,
To keep with joy magnifical
The solemn Easter festival.

Father and Son and Spirit blest,
To thee be every prayer addrest,
Who art in threefold Name adored,
From age to age, the only Lord. Amen.

Word: Anonymous, ca. 12th C.; tr. Thomas A. Lacey, 1906.
Chant: “Iesu Quadragenariae” Gregorian Chant, Mode IV.
Tune (The English Hymnal):Plaistow” from ‘Magdalen Hymns,’ ca. 1760.
Meter: 8.8.8.8

The original Latin text of this hymn may be found here.

Posted in Ancient & Mediaeval Hymns, Authorship Debated, Unknown, To Be Determined, Breviaries, English Translation of Non-English Hymn, Hymns By The Greats, Lent, Morning Prayer/Lauds, Non-English Hymns, Offices of the Breviary, Sarum Breviary, The Church Year, The Liturgy of Hours/Breviary, The Liturgy of the Church, Thomas A. Lacey | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Christian! Dost Thou See Them

According to Dr. Neale, this hymn comes from the Stichera for the Second Week of the Great Fast (Lent) in the Triodion. See notes below on the Greek text.

This is the original text of this hymn as it appears in the first edition of Hymns of the Eastern Church (1862). The 5th edition has the minor differences noted below. The English Hymnal (1906) follows the text of the first edition shown below exactly:

Christian! dost thou see them
On the holy ground,
How the troops of Midian
Prowl and prowl around?
Christian! up and smite them,
Counting gain but loss:
Smite them by the merit
Of the Holy Cross!

Christian! dost thou feel them,
How they work within,
Striving, tempting, luring,
Goading into sin?
Christian! never tremble!
Never be down-cast!
Smite them by the virtue
Of the Lenten Fast!

Christian! dost thou hear them,
How they speak thee fair?
Always fast and vigil?
Always watch and prayer?
(1)Christian! answer boldly:
While I breathe I pray:
Peace shall follow battle,
Night shall end in day.

“Well I know thy trouble,
O My servant true;
Thou art very weary,—
I was weary too:
But that toil shall make thee
Some day, all Mine own:
But the end of sorrow
Shall be near My Throne.”

Words: St. Andrew of Crete, 660-732; tr. John Mason Neale, 1862.
Tune (The English Hymn):Gute Bäume Bringen” later form of melody by P. Sohren, d. c. 1692.
Meter: 6.5.6.5.D

(1) This line is rendered this in the 5th edition: “Christian! say but boldly:”

Dr. Neale indicates that the Greek hymn from which this is taken is entitled “οὐ γὰρ βλέπεις τοὺς ταράττοντας.” I was unable to locate this text among the stichera of the second week of Lent in the Triodion. A google search has yielded no results. A Historical Companion to Hymns Ancient and Modern notes simply concerning this hymn: “The Greek of this has not yet been found.”

Posted in Ancient & Mediaeval Hymns, Byzantine and Other Eastern Liturgies, Byzantine Liturgy, English Translation of Non-English Hymn, Greek Hymns, Hymns By The Greats, John Mason Neale, Lent, Non-English Hymns, Original Language Text Needed, Saints of the Church (Canonized or Beatified), Spiritual Warfare, St. Andrew of Crete, The Church Year, The Liturgy of the Church, Triodion | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Now Is The Healing Time Decreed

This hymn was used for Vespers from the Third Sunday of Lent to Passion Sunday in the Sarum Breviary.

This is the original text of this hymn as it appears in The English Hymnal (1906). It is listed in that hymnal as the Evening Office Hymn from the 3rd Sunday of Lent until Passion Sunday:

Now is the healing time decreed
For sins of heart, of word or deed,
When we in humble fear record
The wrong that we have done the Lord;

Who, alway merciful and good,
Has borne so long our wayward mood,
Nor cut us off unsparingly
In our so great iniquity.

Therefore with fasting and with prayer,
Our secret sorrow we declare;
With all good striving seek his face,
And lowly hearted plead for grace.

Cleanse us, O Lord, from every stain,
Help us the meed of praise to gain,
Till with the Angels linked in love
Joyful we tread thy courts above.

Father and Son and Spirit blest,
To thee be every prayer addrest,
Who art in threefold Name adored,
From age to age, the only Lord. Amen.

Words: Attr. Pope St. Gregory the Great (I), 6th C.; Tr. Thomas A. Lacey, 1906.
Tune: “Melody 33” Gregorian melody, Mode III.
Tune (The English Hymnal):Jena (Das Neugeborne Kindelein)” Later form of melody from Vulpius’ Gesangbuch (Jena, 1609).
Meter: 8.8.8.8

The original Latin text of this hymn may be found here.

Posted in Ancient & Mediaeval Hymns, Breviaries, English Translation of Non-English Hymn, Evening Prayer / Vespers, Hymns By The Greats, Lent, Non-English Hymns, Offices of the Breviary, Pope St. Gregory the Great, Saints of the Church (Canonized or Beatified), Sarum Breviary, The Church Year, The Liturgy of Hours/Breviary, The Liturgy of the Church, Thomas A. Lacey | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

O Kind Creator, Bow Thine Ear

This hymn is used for Vespers on Sundays and Weekdays in Lent from the First Sunday in Lent through Passion Sunday in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Breviary. It is used for Vespers on Sundays in Lent until Holy Week in the Ordinary Form. It was used for Vespers during Lent from Ash Wednesday to Passion Sunday in the Paris Breviary (1736). It was used for Lauds during the first three weeks on Lent in the Sarum Breviary. In the Ambrosian Breviary it is used for Vespers I of Sundays and Vespers & Lauds on Weekdays during Lent.

This is the original text of this hymn as it appears in The English Hymnal (1906). It is listed as the Office Hymn for morning  during Lent until the 3rd Sunday:

O Kind Creator, bow thine ear
To mark the cry, to know the tear
Before thy throne of mercy spent
In this thy holy fast of Lent.

Our hearts are open, Lord, to thee:
Thou knowest our infirmity;
Pour out on all who seek thy face
Abundance of thy pardoning grace.

Our sins are many, this we know;
Spare us, good Lord, thy mercy show;
And for the honour of thy name
Our fainting souls to life reclaim.

Give us the self-control that springs
From discipline of outward things,
That fasting inward secretly
The soul may purely dwell with thee.

We pray thee, Holy Trinity,
One God, unchanging Unity,
That we from this our abstinence
May reap the fruits of penitence. Amen.

Words: Pope St. Gregory the Great (I), 6th C.; tr. Thomas A. Lacey, 1906.
Tune: “Audi Benigne Conditor” Gregorian Chant, Tone II, traditional.
Tune (The English Hymnal):Cannons” Georg Friedrich Handel, 1685-1759.
Meter: 8.8.8.8

The original Latin text of this hymn may be found here.

Posted in Ambrosian Breviary, Ancient & Mediaeval Hymns, Breviaries, English Translation of Non-English Hymn, Evening Prayer / Vespers, Hymns By The Greats, Lent, Morning Prayer/Lauds, Non-English Hymns, Offices of the Breviary, Paris Breviary, Pope St. Gregory the Great, Roman Breviary, Saints of the Church (Canonized or Beatified), Sarum Breviary, The Church Year, The Liturgy of Hours/Breviary, The Liturgy of the Church, Thomas A. Lacey | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment