Oh Turn Those Blessed Points All Bath’d

This hymn is a hymn for Lauds on the Friday after the First Sunday in Lent, dedicated to the Spear and Nails of Our Lord Jesus Christ. The text comes from the Office of the Instruments of the Passion, or the Passion Offices, and was translated by Fr. Caswall for the Lyra Catholica in 1849. 

Oh, turn those blessed points, all bath’d
In Jesu’s blood, on me;
Mine were the sins that wrought his death,
Mine be the penalty.

Pierce through my feet, my hands, my heart;
So may some drop distil
Of Blood divine, into my soul,
And all its evil heal.

So shall my feet be slow to sin,
Hamrless my hands shall be;
So from my wounded heart shall each
Forbidden passion flee.

Thee, Jesu, pierc’d with Nails and Spear,
Let every knee adore;
With Thee, O Father, and with Thee,
O Spirit, evermore. Amen.

Words: Passion Offices; tr. Fr. Edward Caswall, 1849.

The original Latin text of this hymn is as follows:

Tincta ergo Christi sanguine*
Convertite in me cuspidem,
Ferite cor, pedes, manus
Poenam a nocente sumite.

At quaeso culpis debitas
Quas iure plagas figitis,
Cruore divino illitae
Fiant medele spiritus.

Sit gressus ad malum impotens,
Manus nocere desinant,
Omnisque corde e saucio
Profanus ardor exeat.

Clavis forato, et Lancea,
Iesu tibi sit gloria,
Cum Patre, et almo Spiritu
Nunc, et per omne saeculum. Amen.

*Fr. Caswall indicates this verse starts with Tinctam, whereas the Officia de Passione, whence this text is taken, indicates Tincta.

Posted in Edward Caswall, Hymns By The Greats, Jesus Christ Our Lord, Latin Hymns, Lent, Morning, Non-English Hymns, Passion Offices/Office of the Instruments of the Passion, The Church Year, The Hours of the Day, The Passion, The Spear and Nails | Leave a comment

What Tongue, Illustrious Spear, Can Duly Sound

This hymn is a hymn for Vespers on the Friday after the First Sunday in Lent, dedicated to the Spear and Nails of Our Lord Jesus Christ. The text comes from the Office of the Instruments of the Passion, or the Passion Offices, and was translated by Fr. Caswall for the Lyra Catholica in 1849. 

What tongue, illustrious Spear, can duly sound
Thy praise, in Heav’n or earth?
Thou, who didst open that life-giving wound,
From whence the Church had birth.

From Adam, sunk in an ecstatic sleep,
Came Eve divinely framed;
From Christ, – his Spouse; when from that wound so deep
The Blood and Water stream’d.

And equal thanks to you, blest Nails, whereby,
Fast to the sacred Rood,
Was clench’d the sentence dooming us to die,
All blotted out in blood.

To Him who still preserves in highest Heaven
The wounds which here He bore,
Be glory, with th’eternal Father, given,
And Spirit evermore. Amen.

Words: Passion Offices; tr. Fr. Edward Caswall, 1849.

The Latin text of this hymn is as follows:

Quaenam lingua tibi, O Lancea, debitas.
Grates pro merito est apta rependere?
Christi vivificum namque aperis latus,
Unde Ecclesia nascitur.

Haec est Heva viri de latere exiens,
Olli membra gravis dum sopor occupat;
Hanc quippe alter Adam corde scatentibus
Unda, et sanguine procreat,

O Clavi! aequa manet vos quoque gratia,
Christi quando sacris artubus insiti,
Deletum Domini sanguine figitis
Mortis chirographum Cruci.

Te, Iesu, superi laudibus efferant,
Qui Clavorum aditus, signaque Lanceae
In Caelo retines, vivus ubi imperas
Cum Patre, atque Paraclito. Amen.

Posted in Edward Caswall, Evening / Vespers, Hymns By The Greats, Jesus Christ Our Lord, Latin Hymns, Lent, Non-English Hymns, Passion Offices/Office of the Instruments of the Passion, The Church Year, The Hours of the Day, The Passion, The Spear and Nails | Leave a comment

Hail, O Queen of Heav’n Enthron’d!

This is Fr. Caswall’s translation of the Marian Antiphon for Lent: (Specifically from February 2 until Wednesday of Holy Week)

Hail, O Queen of Heav’n enthron’d!
Hail, by angels Mistress own’d!
Root of Jesse! Gate of morn!
Whence the world’s true Light was born:
Glorious Virgin, joy to thee,
Loveliest whom in Heaven they see:
Fairest thou where all are fair!
Plead with Christ our sins to spare.

em>Words: Anonymous, 12th Century; tr. Fr. Edward Caswall, 1849.
Simple Tone: “Ave Regina Caelorum (Simplex)” Gregorian Chant, Mode VI, traditional.
Solemn Tone:Ave Regina Caelorum (Solemnis)” Gregorian Chant, Mode IV, traditional.

The Latin text of this Marian Antiphon may be found here.

Posted in Ancient & Mediaeval Hymns, Compline, Edward Caswall, Hymns By The Greats, Latin Hymns, Lent, Marian Antiphons, Non-English Hymns, Roman Breviary, The Blessed Virgin Mary, The Church Year, The Communion of Saints, The Hours of the Day | 1 Comment

The Darkness Fleets, And Joyful Earth

The Darkness fleets and, and Joyful earth
Welcomes the newborn day;
Jesu, true Sun of human souls!
Shed in out souls thy ray.

Thou, who dost give the accepted time,
Give tears to purify,
Give flames of love to burn our hearts,
As victims unto Thee.

Thou fountain, whence our sins have flow’d,
Shall soon in tears distil,
If but thy penitential grace
Subdue the stubborn will.

Lo! day returns, thy own blest day,
All things to joy awake;
Oh, may we, to thy paths restor’d,
In nature’s joy partake!

Eternal Trinity! to Thee
Let Earth’s vast fabric bend;
While evermore from souls renew’d,
New hymns of praise ascend.

Words: Anonymous, ca. 6th century; tr. Fr. Edward Caswall, 1849.
Music:Iam Christe Sol Iustitiae” Gregorian Chant, traditional.

This translation is based off of Pope Urban VIII’s 1632 revision of the Roman Breviary.
The Latin text of this hymn may be found here.

Posted in Ancient & Mediaeval Hymns, Edward Caswall, Hymns By The Greats, Latin Hymns, Lent, Morning, Non-English Hymns, Roman Breviary, The Church Year, The Hours of the Day | 1 Comment

Iam Christe Sol Iustitiae

Iam, Christe, sol iustitiae,
mentis dehiscant tenebrae,
virtutum ut lux redeat,
terris diem cum reparas.

Dans tempus acceptabile
et paenitens cor tribue,
convertat ut benignitas
quos longa suffert pietas.

Quiddamque paenitentiae
da ferre, quo fit demptio,
maiore tuo munere,
culparum quamvis grandium.

Dies venit, dies tua,
per quam reflorent omnia;
laetemur in hac ut tuae
per hanc reducti gratiae.

Te rerum universitas,
clemens, adoret, Trinitas,
et nos novi per veniam
novum canamus canticum.
Amen.

Words: Anonymous, ca. 6th century.*
Music:Iam Christe Sol Iustitiae” Gregorian Chant, traditional.

*date is debated,some say 10th century

This hymn takes the following form in Pope Urban VIII’s 1632 reform of the Breviary:

O Sol salutis, initimis
Iesu, refulge mentibus,
dum nocte pulsa, gratior
orbi dies renascitur.

Dans tempus acceptabile,
da lacrimarum rivulis
lavare cordis victimam,
quam laeta adurat caritas.

Quo fonte manavit nefas,
fluent perennes lacrimae,
si virga paenitentiae
cordis rigorem conterat.

Dies venit, dies tua,
in qua reflorent omnia:
laetemur et nos in viam
tua reducti dextera.

Te prona mundi machina,
clemens, adoret, Trinitas,
et nos novi per gratiam
novum canamus canticum. Amen.

This hymn has been translated into English as “The Darkness Fleets, and Joyful Earth.”

Posted in Ancient & Mediaeval Hymns, Latin Hymns, Lent, Morning, Non-English Hymns, Roman Breviary, The Church Year, The Hours of the Day | 1 Comment

Now With The Slow-Revolving Year

Now with the slow-revolving year,
Again the Fast we greet;
Which in its mystic circle moves
Of forty days complete.

That Fast by Law and Prophets taught,
By Jesus Christ restor’d;
Jesus, of seasons and of times
The Maker and the Lord.

Henceforth more sparing let us be
Of food, of words, of sleep;
Henceforth beneath a stricter guard
The roving senses keep.

And let us shun whatever things
Distract the careless heart;
And let us shut the soul against
The tyrant Tempter’s art;

And weep before the Judge, and strive
His vengeance to appease;
Saying to Him with contrite voice,
Upon our bended knees:

“Much have we sinn’d, O Lord! and still
We sin each day we livve;
Yet pour thy pity from on high,
And of thy grace forgive.

Remember that we still are thine,
Though of a fallen frame;
And take not from us in thy wrath
The glory of thy name.

Undo past evil; grant us Lord,
More grace to do aright;
So may we now and ever find
Acceptance in thy sight.”

Blest Trinity in Unity!
Vouchsafe us in thy love,
To gather fro these fasts below
Immortal fruit above. Amen.

Words: Pope St. Gregory the Great (I), 6th Century; tr. Fr. Edward Caswall, 1849.
Music:Ex More Docti Mystico” Gregorian Chant, Tone I, traditional.

The original Latin text of this hymn may be found here.

Posted in Ancient & Mediaeval Hymns, Edward Caswall, Hymns By The Greats, Latin Hymns, Lent, Matins/Office of Readings, Non-English Hymns, Pope St. Gregory the Great, Roman Breviary, Saints of the Church (Canonized or Beatified), The Church Year, The Hours of the Day | 1 Comment

Ex More Docti Mystico

Ex more docti mystico
servemus abstinentiam,
deno dierum circulo
ducto quater notissimo.

Lex et prophetae primitus
hanc praetulerunt, postmodum
Christus sacravit, omnium
rex atque factor temporum.

Utamur ergo parcius
verbis, cibis et potibus,
somno, iocis et arctius
perstemus in custodia.

Vitemus autem pessima
quae subruunt mentes vagas,
nullumque demus callido
hosti locum tyrannidis.

Precemur omnes cernui,
clamemus atque singuli,
ploremus ante iudicem,
flectamus iram vindicem:

Nostris malis offendimus
tuam, Deus, clementiam;
effunde nobis desuper,
remissor, indulgentiam.

Memento quod sumus tui,
licet caduci, plasmatis;
ne des honorem nominis
tui, precamur, alteri.

Laxa malum quod fecimus,
auge bonum quod poscimus,
placere quo tandem tibi
possimus hic et perpetim.

Praesta, beata Trinitas,
concede, simplex Unitas,
ut fructuosa sint tuis
haec parcitatis munera. Amen.

Words: Pope St. Gregory the Great (I), 6th Century.
Music:Ex More Docti Mystico” Gregorian Chant, Tone I, traditional.

This hymn takes the following form in Pope Urban VIII’s 1632 reform of the Breviary:

Ex more docti mystico
servemus hoc ieiunium,
deno dierum circulo
ducto quater notissimo.

Lex et prophetae primitus
hanc praetulerunt, postmodum
Christus sacravit, omnium
rex atque factor temporum.

Utamur ergo parcius
verbis, cibis et potibus,
somno, iocis et arctius
perstemus in custodia.

Vitemus autem noxia
quae subruunt mentes vagas,
nullumque demus callidi
hostis locum tyrannidi.

Flectamus iram vindicem,
ploremus ante Iudicem,
clamemus ore supplici,
dicamus omnes cernui:

Nostris malis offendimus
tuam, Deus, clementiam;
effunde nobis desuper,
remissor, indulgentiam.

Memento quod sumus tui,
licet caduci, plasmatis;
ne des honorem nominis
tui, precamur, alteri.

Laxa malum quod fecimus,
auge bonum quod poscimus,
placere quo tandem tibi
possimus hic et perpetim.

Praesta, beata Trinitas,
concede, simplex Unitas,
ut fructuosa sint tuis
ieiuniorum munera. Amen.

This hymn has been translated into English as “By Precepts Taught of Ages Past” and “Now With the Slow-Revolving Year.”

Posted in Ancient & Mediaeval Hymns, Hymns By The Greats, Latin Hymns, Lent, Matins/Office of Readings, Non-English Hymns, Pope St. Gregory the Great, Roman Breviary, Saints of the Church (Canonized or Beatified), The Church Year, The Hours of the Day | 2 Comments