Now That The Daylight Dies Away

This hymn is used for Compline throughout the year on each weekday.

Now that the daylight dies away,
By all Thy grace and love,
Thee, Maker of the world, we pray
To watch our bed above.

Let dreams depart and phantoms fly,
The offspring of the night,
Keep us, like shrines, beneath Thine eye,
Pure in our foe’s despite.

This grace on Thy redeemed confer,
Father, co-equal Son,
And Holy Ghost, the Comforter,
Eternal Three in One.

Words: Latin, ca. 6th C.; tr. Bl. John Henry Cardinal Newman, 1836.
Tune:St. FlavianDay’s Psalter, 1563.

The original Latin text of this hymn may be found here.

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About Noah

musings of a young Catholic aspiring to be faithful to his Lord and God Jesus Christ through His Holy Catholic Church
This entry was posted in Ambrosian Breviary, Authorship Debated, Unknown, To Be Determined, Bl. John Henry Newman, Compline, English Translation of Non-English Hymn, Hymns By The Greats, Non-English Hymns, Roman Breviary, The Liturgy of Hours/Breviary. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Now That The Daylight Dies Away

  1. I AM GATHERING USEFUL NIGHT TIME PRAYERS LIKE THE HYMN ABOVE AND FROM PROVERBS AND PSALMS. USEFUL AS IN DEFEATING INSOMNIA..
    I CHANGED “DAYLIGHT FADES AWAY” I DON’T KNOW IF IT;S HELPFUL TO MENTION DEATH BEFORE SLEEP. FOR NORMAL PEOPLE IT IS PROBABLY PERFECTLY FINE.
    DO YOU KNOW ANY OTHER HYMNS THAT HAVE SIMILAR THEMES?
    THANKS

    • Noah says:

      I apologize for my slow response. I have been somewhat inactive for a while on this site, though I have been trying to give it more attention in the last few weeks. As far as other hymns that may be helpful, the categories of “Compline” and “Nighttime” on the right side of the page under the “Liturgy of the Hours/Hours of the Day” heading would be a great place to start, though I hope to combine Compline and Nighttime into one category soon since they are essentially redundant categories. One particular hymn I can think of off the top of my head is “Abide With Me Fast Falls The Eventide”.

  2. Pingback: Te Lucis Ante Terminum | Saint Augustine's Lyre

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