Lord, As To Thy Dear Cross We Flee

This is the text as it appears in  Hymns Ancient and Modern (1867):

Lord, as to Thy dear Cross we flee,
And plead to be forgiven,
So let Thy Life our Pattern be,
And form our souls for Heaven.

Help us, through good report and ill,
Our daily cross to bear;
Like Thee, to do our Father’s Will,
Our brethren’s griefs to share.

Let Grace our selfishness expel,
Our earthliness refine;
And kindness in Our bosoms dwell,
As free and true as Thine.

If joy shall at Thy bidding fly,
And grief’s dark day come on,
We in our turn would meekly cry,
“Father, Thy Will be done.”

Kept peaceful in the midst of strife,
Forgiving and forgiven,
O may we lead the pilgrim’s life,
And follow Thee to Heaven. Amen.

Words: John Hampden Gurney, 1838.
Tune:Windsor Christopher Tye, 1533.
Meter: 8.6.8.6

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There Is A Blessèd Home

This is the text as it appears in  Hymns Ancient and Modern (1867):

There is a blessèd Home
Beyond this land of woe,
Where trials never come,
Nor tears of sorrow flow;
Where Faith is lost in sight,
And patient Hope is crowned,
And everlasting Light
Its glory throws around.

There is a land of Peace, —
Good angels know it well;
Glad songs that never cease
Within its portals swell;
Around its glorious Throne
Ten thousand saints adore
Christ, with the Father One
And Spirit, evermore.

О joy all joys beyond!
To see the Lamb Who died,
And count each sacred Wound
In Hands, and Feet, and Side!
To give to Him the praise
Of every triumph won,
And sing through endless days
The great things He hath done.

Look up, ye saints of God,
Nor fear to tread below
The path your Saviour trod
Of daily toil and woe;
Wait but a little, while
In uncomplaining Love,
His Own most gracious Smile
Shall welcome you above. Amen.

Words: Henry W. Baker, 1861.
Tune:7th Mode Melody” Thomas Tallis, 16th C.

Alternate Tune:Hawarden Samuel S. Wesley, 1872.
Meter: 6.6.6.6.D

Hymns Ancient and Modern (1867) provides the following Latin Translation by Lord Lyttelton in the margin:

Est beatorum Domus incolarum
Gentis humanæ gemitu remota,
Qua silent curæ, neque lacrimarum
Surgit amaror:
Nec Fides rerum superest potitis:
Spes capit seram patiens coronam:
Lux inexhausti radiat per ædes
Dia nitoris.

Sunt et æternæ loca læta Pacis,—
Novit almorum chorus Angelorum;
Carmen exsultans sine fine vastas
Personat aulas.
Fulgida cingit Solium corona
Turma sanctorum numero carentum:
Spiritum et Magno venerantur Unum
Cum Patre Christum.

O voluptates superans voluptas!
Si necem passum videamus Agnum,
Illaque in Palmis, Pedibus, sacraque
Vulnera Costa!
Ille, si cui contigerit triumphus,
Occupet laudem: sit in omne sæclum
Digna concordi celebrare cantu
Illius acta.

Rite qui Divum colitis (1)Dominum,
Ista, quam mœrens subiit Redemptor,
Ne sit et vobis metuenda duræ
Semita vitæ.
Ipse, quos norit patiens Amoris
Munus angusto coluisse in ævo,
Suave subridens Superum beatis
Cœtibus addet. Amen.

(1)Lord Lyttelton has “Iehovam” here – I have altered the text to conform to the practice of not pronouncing the Divine Name directly.

Posted in Christian Hope, Henry W. Baker, Hymns By The Greats, Latin Hymns, Praise to God, The Christian Life And Mission, The Church Triumphant/The Heavenly Jerusalem, Translations of English Hymns to Other Languages | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Soldiers Of Christ, Arise

This is the text as it appears in  Hymns Ancient and Modern (1867):

Soldiers of Christ, arise,
And put your armour on,
Strong in the Strength which God supplies
Through His Eternal Son.

Strong in the Lord of Hosts,
And in His mighty Power;
Who in the Strength of Jesus trusts
Is more than conqueror.

Stand then in His great Might,
With all His Strength endued;
And take, to arm you for the fight,
The Panoply of God.

From strength to strength go on,
Wrestle, and fight, and pray;
Tread all the powers of darkness down,
And win the well-fought day.

That having all things done,
And all your conflicts past,
Ye may obtain, through Christ alone,
A crown of joy at last.

Jesu, Eternal Son,
We praise Thee and adore,
Who art with God the Father One,
And Spirit evermore. Amen.

Words: Charles Wesley, 1745.
Tune:Aynhoe James Nares (1715-1783).
Meter: 6.6.8.6

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O Mother! I Could Weep For Mirth

This hymn comes from Hymns By Frederick Faber, D.D. (1871 edition) and is under the title “Immaculate! Immaculate!” It is a hymn for the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception.

O Mother! I could weep for mirth,
Joy fills my heart so fast;
My soul today is heaven on earth,
O could the transport last!
I think of thee, and what thou art,
Thy majesty, thy state;
And I keep singing in my heart,—
Immaculate! Immaculate!

When Jesus looks upon thy face,
His Heart with rapture glows,
And in the Church, by His sweet grace,
Thy blessed worship grows.
I think of thee, and what thou art,
Thy majesty, thy state;
And I keep singing in my heart,—
Immaculate! Immaculate!

The angels answer with their songs,
Bright choirs in gleaming rows;
And saints flock round thy feet in throngs,
And heaven with bliss o’erflows.
I think of thee, and what thou art,
Thy majesty, thy state;
And I keep singing in my heart,—
Immaculate! Immaculate!

And I would rather, Mother dear!
Thou shouldst be what thou art,
Than sit where thou dost, oh so near
Unto the Sacred Heart.
I think of thee, and what thou art,
Thy majesty, thy state;
And I keep singing in my heart,—
Immaculate! Immaculate!

Yes, I would forfeit all for thee,
Eather than thou shouldst miss
One jewel from thy majesty,
One glory from thy bliss.
I think of thee and what thou art,
Thy majesty, thy state;
And I keep singing in my heart,—
Immaculate! Immaculate!

Nay, I could die, and with the sense
That ’twere but loss to live,
Could I but die in dear defence
Of this prerogative.
I think of thee, and what thou art
Thy majesty, thy state;
And I keep singing in my heart,—
Immaculate! Immaculate!

Conceived, conceived Immaculate!
Oh what a joy for thee!
Conceived, conceived Immaculate!
Oh greater joy for me!
I think of thee, and what thou art,
Thy majesty, thy state;
And I keep singing in my heart,—
Immaculate! Immaculate!

It is this thought today that lifts
My happy heart to heaven,
That for our sakes thy choicest gifts
To thee, dear Queen! were given.
I think of thee, and what thou art,
Thy majesty, thy state;
And I keep singing in my heart,—
Immaculate! Immaculate!

The glory that belongs to thee
Seems rather mine than thine,
While all the cares that harass me
Are rather thine than mine.
I think of thee, and what thou art,
Thy majesty, thy state;
And I keep singing in my heart,—
Immaculate! Immaculate!

Then Blessed be the Eternal Son,
Who joys to call thee mother,
And lets poor men by sin undone
For thy sake call Him brother.
I think of thee, and what thou art,
Thy majesty, thy state;
And I keep singing in my heart,—
Immaculate! Immaculate!

Immaculate Conception! far
Above all graces blest!
Thou shinest like a royal star
On God’s Eternal Breast.
I think of thee, and what thou art,
Thy majesty, thy state;
And I keep singing in my heart,—
Immaculate! Immaculate!

God prosper thee, my Mother dear!
God prosper thee, my Queen!
God prosper His own glory here,
As it hath ever been!
I think of thee, and what thou art,
Thy majesty, thy state;
And I keep singing in my heart,—
Immaculate! Immaculate!

Words: Fr. Frederick William Faber, C.O., 19th C.
Tune: No tune exists in this meter – though if grace notes are added to the last line of “Old 22nd” (Este’s Psalter, 1592), this is a fitting tune for the hymn.
Meter: 8.6.8.6.8.6.8.8

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The Day, The Happy Day, Is Dawning

This hymn comes from Hymns By Frederick Faber, D.D. (1871 edition) and is under the title “Sine Labe Originali Concepta.” It is a hymn for the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception.

The day, the happy day, is dawning,
The glorious feast of Mary’s chiefest praise,
That brightens, like a second morning,
The clouded evening of these latter days.
O every clime! O every nation!
Praise, praise the God of our salvation!

High up, the realm of angels ringeth
With hymns of triumph to its mortal Queen,
While earth its song of welcome singeth
In every shady grove and valley green.
O every clime! O every nation!
Praise, praise the God of our salvation!

Hail Queen, whose life is just beginning,
Thrice welcome, Mother of a fallen race!
The sinless come to save the sinning,
Thyself the chosen aqueduct of grace!
O every clime! O every nation!
Praise, praise the God of our salvation!

Immaculate! O dear exemption!
A spotless soul for God, entire and free,
Redeemed with such a choice redemption,
Angel nor saint can share the praise with thee.
O every clime! O every nation!
Praise, praise the God of our salvation!

O Virgin brighter than the brightest
‘Mid all the beauteous throngs that shine above!
O maiden whiter than the whitest
Of lily flowers in Eden’s sacred grove!
O every clime! O every nation!
Praise, praise the God of our salvation .

Chief miracle of God’s compassion,
Choice mirror of His burning holiness,
Whose heart His mercy deigned to fashion
Far more than Eve’s sad ruin to redress,
O every clime! O every nation!
Praise, praise the God of our salvation!

Earth’s cities! let your bells be reeling,
And all your temple-gates wide open fling,
With banners flying, cannon pealing,
The blessed Queen of our Redemption sing.
O every clime! O every nation!
Praise, praise the God of our salvation!

See! Mary comes! O jubilation!
She comes with love to cheer a guilty race;
O triumph, triumph, all Creation!
O Christians! triumph in redeeming grace.
O every clime! O every nation!
Praise, praise the God of our salvation!

Words: Fr. Frederick William Faber, C.O., 19th C.
Tune:Crasselius” Melody pub. Halle, 1704.
Meter: 9.10.9.10.9.9

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O Purest Of Creatures! Sweet Mother! Sweet Maid

This hymn comes from Hymns By Frederick Faber, D.D. (1871 edition) and is under the title “The Immaculate Conception.”

O purest of creatures! sweet Mother! sweet Maid
The one spotless womb wherein Jesus was laid!
Dark night hath come down on us, Mother! and we
Look out for thy shining, sweet Star of the Sea!”

Deep night hath come down on this rough-spoken world,
And the banners of darkness are boldly unfurled:
And the tempest-tost Church—all her eyes are on thee,
They look to thy shining, sweet Star of the Sea!

The Church doth what God had first taught her to do;
He looked o’er the world to find hearts that were true;
Through the ages He looked, and He found none but thee,
And He loved thy clear shining, sweet Star of the Sea!

He gazed on thy soul; it was spotless and fair;
For the empire of sin—it had never been there;
None had e’er owned thee, dear Mother, but He,
And He blessed thy clear shining, sweet Star of the Sea!

Earth gave Him one lodging; ’twas deep in thy breast,
And God found a home where the sinner finds rest;
His home and His hiding-place, both were in thee;
He was won by thy shining, sweet Star of the Sea!

Oh blissful and, calm was the wonderful rest
That thou gavest thy God in thy virginal breast;
For the heaven He left He found heaven in thee,
And He shone in thy shining, sweet Star of the Sea!

To sinners what comfort, to angels what mirth,
That God found one creature unfallen on earth,
One spot where His Spirit untroubled could be,
The depths of thy shining, sweet Star of the Sea!

So age after age in the Church has gone round,
And the saints new inventions of homage have found,
New titles of honour, new honours for thee,
New love for thy shining, sweet Star of the Sea!

And now from the Church of all lands thy dear name
Comes borne on the breath of one mighty acclaim;
Men call on their father that he should decree
A new gem to thy shining, sweet Star of the Sea!

O shine on us brighter than ever, then, shine!
For the primest of honours, dear Mother! is thine;
“Conceived without sin,” thy new title shall be,
Clear light from thy birth-spring, sweet Star of the Sea!

So worship we God in these rude latter days;
So worship we Jesus our Love, when we praise
His wonderful grace in the gifts He gave thee,
The gift of clear shining, sweet Star of the Sea!

Deep night hath come down on us, Mother, deep night,
And we need more than ever the guide of thy light;
For the darker the night is, the brighter should be
Thy beautiful shining, sweet Star of the Sea!

Words: Fr. Frederick William Faber, C.O., 19th C.
Tune:Normandy” Basque Carol.
Meter: 11.11.11.11

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The Stars Retire, When First The Sun

This is the original text of this hymn from Fr. Oakley’s Lyra Liturgica (1865). It is listed in that hymnal under the heading “Stella Matutina.” The content of the hymn focuses on the feasts falling during Advent and the role of the Blessed Virgin in the prayers throughout. Mention is made of the Immaculate Conception, and so it is an appropriate hymn for that feast:

The stars retire, when first the sun
His giant race essays to run;
Those lamps that stud the arch of night
Wax pale before the fount of light.

One only star nor fades nor sleeps.
But still her twilight station keeps,
With eye undimm’d and beams unshorn;
The bright, the peerless Star of Morn.

When Christmas first reveals its light,
The Church’s firmament is dight;
Her stars still pave the wintry sky,
A great and glorious galaxy;

Martyrs and Virgins,(1) Pontiffs bold,(2)
And Doctors with their words of gold;(3)
Then comes a void, as, one by one,
The stars retreat before the Sun;(4)

Save that Apostle, whom his Lord
From chilling doubt to faith restor’d;
Who now beside His Cradle pays
No tardy vows, no faltering praise.

But Mary all the while is there
In hymn, or antiphon, or prayer;
Shedding o’er every page and line
A lustre, only not divine.

When Advent lessons first begin,
We muse on Mary clear of sin,
And in the Virgin’s primal grace
The promise of the Mother trace:

And meet it were, and duteous, sure,
That Mother should from stain be pure;
Who did, by high prerogative,
The Manhood to her Maker give.

For eight full days,(5) with reverence due,
We linger fondly o’er the view
Of her, on whom the Father’s Eye
Dwelt with intent complacency;

For, mirror’d in that glass, He saw,
Undimm’d by cloud, unspoil’d by flaw
(Albeit in creature’s meek estate),
The Beauty of the Uncreate.

Years roll away—the Virgin pure
Is stablished, lo, in grace secure;
Girlhood’s soft bloom still gilds her brow,
But matron honours crown it now.(6)

‘Mary in hope’—O Mother-Maid,
What thoughts thy wondering heart pervade!
But wait awhile, and God will ope
Visions, transcending e’en their scope.

Speed on, ye lagging moments, speed,
Till joy fulfill’d to hope succeed;
And Mary’s patient faith have won
God for our Saviour, and her Son.

Words: Fr. Frederick Oakeley, 1865.
Tune: “Antwerp” W. Smallwood (1831-1897).
Meter: 8.8.8.8

These are Fr. Oakeley’s original footnotes in the Lyra Liturgica hymnal. The notes reflect the structure of the Roman Calendar at the time. St. Bibiana is no longer a universal observance and St. Thomas has been moved to July 3 on the current Roman Calendar:
(1) St. Bibiana

(2) St. Ambrose
(3) St. Chrysologus
(4) The Festivals of the Saints become rarer as Advent advances; and there is none between December 16th and Christmas- Day, with the exception of that of St. Thomas the Apostle. The Feast of the ‘Expectation’ is noticed later. The Blessed Virgin, meanwhile, is commemorated throughout Advent in the Office of the Season.
(5) Octave of the Immaculate Conception.
(6) The Feast of the Expectation follows the Octave of the Immaculate Conception after two days’ interval.

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