O Sons And Daughters Let Us Sing

This is the text as it appears in  Hymns Ancient and Modern (1861) as altered by the compilers:

Alleluia! Alleluia! Alleluia!
O sons and daughters, let us sing!
The King of heaven, the glorious King,
O’er death to-day rose triumphing.
Alleluia!

That Sunday morn, at break of day,
The faithful women went their way
To seek the tomb where Jesus lay.
Alleluia!

An Angel clad in white they see,
Who sat and spake unto the three,
“Your Lord doth go to Galilee.”
Alleluia!

That night the Apostles met in fear;
Amidst them came their Lord most dear,
And said, “My Peace be on all here!”
Alleluia!

When Didymus the tidings heard,
He doubted if it were the Lord,
Until He came and spake this word;
Alleluia!

“My piercèd Side, O Thomas, see;
My Hands, My Feet, I show to thee;
Nor faithless, but believing be.”
Alleluia!

No longer Thomas then denied;
He saw the Feet, the Hands, the Side;
” Thou art my Lord and God,” he cried.
Alleluia!

How blest are they who have not seen,
And yet whose faith hath constant been;
For they eternal Life shall win.
Alleluia!

On this most holy Day of days,
To God your hearts and voices raise
In laud, and jubilee, and praise.
Alleluia! Amen.

Words: Jean Tisserand, 15th C.; tr. John Mason Neale, 1851.
Tune:O Filii et Filiae” French melody, 15th Century.
Meter: 8.8.8.4 plus antiphons.

This is the original text of this hymn as it appears in the 1856 edition of John Mason Neale’s Hymnal Noted, expanded edition (1854):

Semi-Chorus: Alleluia! Alleluia! Alleluia!
Ye sons and daughters of the King,
Whom Heav’nly hosts in glory sing,
Today the grave hath lost its sting.
Alleluia.
Chorus: Alleluia, Alleluia, Alleluia.

On that first morning of the week,
Before the day began to break,
The Marys went their Lord to seek.
Alleluia.
Chorus.

An Angel bade their sorrow flee:
For thus he spake unto the three,
‘Your Lord is gone to Galilee.’
Alleluia.
Chorus.

That night th’Apostles met in fear:
Amidst them came their Lord most dear,
And said: ‘Peace be unto you here!’
Alleluia.
Chorus.

When Thomas afterwards had heard
That Jesus had fulfill’d His word,
He doubted if it were the Lord.
Alleluia.
Chorus.

‘Thomas, behold My Side,’ saith He:
‘My Hands, My Feet, My Body see;
And doubt not, but believe in Me.’
Alleluia.
Chorus.

No longer Thomas then denied;
He saw the Feet, the Hands, the Side;
‘Thou art my Lord and God,’ he cried.
Alleluia.
Chorus.

Blessed are they that have not seen,
And yet whose faith hath constant been
In Life Eternal they shall reign. Alleluia.
Chorus.

On this most holy Day of days,
To God your hearts and voices raise,
In laud, and jubilee, and praise. Alleluia.
Chorus.

And we with Holy Church unite,
As evermore is just and right
In glory to the King of Light.
Alleluia.
Chorus.

This is the text of this hymn as it appears in The English Hymnal (1906) where it is listed as a hymn for the evening procession on Easter Day:

Alleluya! Alleluya! Alleluya!
Ye sons and daughters of the King,
Whom heavenly hosts in glory sing,
To-day the grave hath lost its sting.
Alleluya!

On that first morning of the week,
Before the day began to break,
The Marys went their Lord to seek.
Alleluya!

An Angel bade their sorrow flee,
For thus he spake unto the three:
‘Your Lord is gone to Galilee.’
Alleluya!

That night the Apostles met in fear,
Amidst them came their Lord most dear,
And said: “Peace be unto you here!’
Alleluya!

When Thomas afterwards had heard
That Jesus had fulfilled his word,
He doubted if it were the Lord.
Alleluya!

‘Thomas, behold my side,’ saith he,
‘My hands, my feet, my body see;
‘And doubt not, but believe in me.’
Alleluya!

No longer Thomas then denied;
He saw the feet, the hands, the side;
‘Thou art my Lord and God,’ he cried.
Alleluya!

Blessèd are they that have not seen,
And yet whose faith hath constant been,
In life eternal they shall reign.
Alleluya!

On this most holy day of days,
To God your hearts and voices raise
In laud, and jubilee, and praise.
Alleluya!

And we with Holy Church unite,
As evermore is just and right,
In glory to the King of Light.
Alleluya!

V. The Lord is risen from the tomb.
R. Who for our sakes hung upon the Tree. Alleluya.

Collect for Easter Even.

In returning up the Nave, Ps. 115, Non nobis Domine, may be sung by Chanters and People in alternate verses, with Alleluya at the end of each verse.

At the Chancel step all may stand, while verse 15, Ye are the blessed of the Lord, to the end of the Gloria Patri is sung, followed by:

V. Tell it out among the heathen.
R. That the Lord hath reigned from the Tree. Alleluya.

Collect for Palm Sunday.

The original Latin text of this hymn may be found here.

About Noah

musings of a young Catholic aspiring to be faithful to his Lord and God Jesus Christ through His Holy Catholic Church
This entry was posted in 1. The Resurrection of Our Lord Jesus Christ, Ancient & Mediaeval Hymns, Easter, English Translation of Non-English Hymn, Hymns By The Greats, John Mason Neale, Non-English Hymns, Processions/Processionals, The Church Year, The Glorious Mysteries, The Holy Rosary and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to O Sons And Daughters Let Us Sing

  1. Pingback: O Filii Et Filiae | Saint Augustine's Lyre

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